more text
authorBdale Garbee <bdale@gag.com>
Mon, 10 Jul 2017 18:49:42 +0000 (12:49 -0600)
committerBdale Garbee <bdale@gag.com>
Mon, 10 Jul 2017 18:49:42 +0000 (12:49 -0600)
rockets/airframes/CorporateColors/index.mdwn

index f62ab0f..20e519d 100644 (file)
@@ -17,19 +17,23 @@ tip laminations got hot enough for the epoxy to soften allowing the carbon
 fiber to be ripped off...  West System is and will continue to be my go-to 
 epoxy for normal airframe builds, and worked great on a previous project
 that got to Mach 2.21... but with a glass transition temperature of 129-242 F,
-it's just not up to the challenge of staying together above Mach 3!
-
-So, for this build, the plan was to use essentially the same design, but 
-switch to one of the Cotronics high-temperature epoxies.  Others have talked
-about using lesser epoxy for the bulk of the fin build-up laminations and then
-just using Cotronics as a top coat, or the thicker version to build up leading 
-edges, but it seemed to me that using the lower viscosity type for all of the
-fin can laminations might be the easiest way to go.  After studying the
+it's just not up to the challenge of staying together above Mach 3! 
+
+So, for this build, the plan was to use the same design and build techniques, 
+but switch to one of the Cotronics high-temperature epoxies.  Because high
+temperature epoxy is seen as expensive, others have talked about using lesser 
+epoxy for the bulk of the fin build-up laminations and then just using 
+Cotronics as a top coat, or the thicker version to build up leading 
+edges.  But it seemed to me that using the lower viscosity type and staying
+with the same build approach would both be the easiest way to go, and from
+a learning perspective the idea of "change only one variable at a time" really
+appealed to me.  After studying the
 options, I chose [Duralco 4461](https://www.cotronics.com/vo/cotr/pdf/4461.pdf)
 which is supposed to be good to 500 F with a suitable post-cure.  A pint kit
 with shipping cost me nearly $130, but I used much less than half the kit 
 building this airframe.  So, in the grand scheme of things, it's not that
-expensive.
+expensive.  I just need to make another fin can or two with it before the
+shelf life expires!
 
 ## Design Details
 
@@ -37,6 +41,10 @@ This is basically a "2 fins and a nose cone" design, using a single 5 foot
 length of filament would fiberglass airframe, a filament would nose cone
 with aluminum tip, and plywood fins covered with tip to tip carbon fiber.  
 
+Due to the CTI M2245 reload that was used for the first attempt not being
+available for a while, the M3464 Loki Blue from Scott Kormeier at 
+[Loki Research](http://lokiresearch.com) was chosen to power this attempt.
+
 The fins were made using high quality 1/8" Baltic birch plywood cores glued 
 into slots milled in the airframe tube, then 3 layers of 5.8 oz 2x2 twill 
 carbon fiber were laminated "tip to tip" across the airframe through each