Merge remote-tracking branch 'origin/master'
authorKeith Packard <keithp@keithp.com>
Thu, 25 Aug 2011 06:06:44 +0000 (23:06 -0700)
committerKeith Packard <keithp@keithp.com>
Thu, 25 Aug 2011 06:06:44 +0000 (23:06 -0700)
1  2 
doc/altusmetrum.xsl

@@@ -583,154 -583,7 +583,80 @@@ NAR #88757, TRA #1220
            simultaneously.
          </para>
        </section>
 +      <section>
 +      <title>Maximum Flight Log</title>
 +      <para>
 +        TeleMetrum version 1.1 has 2MB of on-board flash storage,
 +        enough to hold over 40 minutes of data at full data rate
 +        (100 samples/second). TeleMetrum 1.0 has 1MB of on-board
 +        storage. As data are stored at a reduced rate during
 +        descent, there's plenty of space to store many flights worth
 +        of data.
 +      </para>
 +      <para>
 +        The on-board flash is partitioned into separate flight logs,
 +        each of a fixed maximum size. Increase the maximum size of
 +        each log and you reduce the number of flights that can be
 +        stored. Decrease the size and TeleMetrum can store more
 +        flights.
 +      </para>
 +      <para>
 +        All of the configuration data is also stored in the flash
 +        memory, which consumes 64kB on TeleMetrum v1.1 and 256B on
 +        TeleMetrum v1.0. This configuration space is not available
 +        for storing flight log data.
 +      </para>
 +      <para>
 +        To compute the amount of space needed for a single flight,
 +        you can multiply the expected ascent time (in seconds) by
 +        800, multiply the expected descent time (in seconds) by 80
 +        and add the two together. That will slightly under-estimate
 +        the storage (in bytes) needed for the flight. For instance,
 +        a flight spending 20 seconds in ascent and 150 seconds in
 +        descent will take about (20 * 800) + (150 * 80) = 28000
 +        bytes of storage. You could store dozens of these flights in
 +        the on-board flash.
 +      </para>
 +      <para>
 +        The default size, 192kB, allows for 10 flights of storage on
 +        TeleMetrum v1.1 and 5 flights on TeleMetrum v1.0. This
 +        ensures that you won't need to erase the memory before
 +        flying each time while still allowing more than sufficient
 +        storage for each flight.
 +      </para>
 +      </section>
 +      <section>
 +      <title>Ignite Mode</title>
 +      <para>
 +        Instead of firing one charge at apogee and another charge at
 +        a fixed height above the ground, you can configure the
 +        altimeter to fire both at apogee or both during
 +        descent. This was added to support an airframe that has two
 +        TeleMetrum computers, one in the fin can and one in the
 +        nose.
 +      </para>
 +      <para>
 +        Providing the ability to use both igniters for apogee or
 +        main allows some level of redundancy without needing two
 +        flight computers.  In Redundant Apogee or Redundant Main
 +        mode, the two charges will be fired two seconds apart.
 +      </para>
 +      </section>
 +      <section>
 +      <title>Pad Orientation</title>
 +      <para>
 +        TeleMetrum measures acceleration along the axis of the
 +        board. Which way the board is oriented affects the sign of
 +        the acceleration value. Instead of trying to guess which way
 +        the board is mounted in the air frame, TeleMetrum must be
 +        explicitly configured for either Antenna Up or Antenna
 +        Down. The default, Antenna Up, expects the end of the
 +        TeleMetrum board connected to the 70cm antenna to be nearest
 +        the nose of the rocket, with the end containing the screw
 +        terminals nearest the tail.
 +      </para>
 +      </section>
      </section>
-     <section>
-       <title>Calibration</title>
-       <para>
-         There are only two calibrations required for a TeleMetrum board, and
-         only one for TeleDongle and TeleMini.
-       </para>
-       <section>
-         <title>Radio Frequency</title>
-         <para>
-           The radio frequency is synthesized from a clock based on the 48 MHz
-           crystal on the board.  The actual frequency of this oscillator must be
-           measured to generate a calibration constant.  While our GFSK modulation
-           bandwidth is wide enough to allow boards to communicate even when
-           their oscillators are not on exactly the same frequency, performance
-           is best when they are closely matched.
-           Radio frequency calibration requires a calibrated frequency counter.
-           Fortunately, once set, the variation in frequency due to aging and
-           temperature changes is small enough that re-calibration by customers
-           should generally not be required.
-         </para>
-       <para>
-         When the radio calibration value is changed, the radio
-         frequency value is reset to the same value, so you'll need
-         to recompute and reset the radio frequency value using the
-         new radio calibration value.
-       </para>
-       </section>
-       <section>
-         <title>TeleMetrum Accelerometer</title>
-         <para>
-           The TeleMetrum accelerometer we use has its own 5 volt power supply and
-           the output must be passed through a resistive voltage divider to match
-           the input of our 3.3 volt ADC.  This means that unlike the barometric
-           sensor, the output of the acceleration sensor is not ratio-metric to
-           the ADC converter, and calibration is required.  We also support the
-           use of any of several accelerometers from a Freescale family that
-           includes at least +/- 40g, 50g, 100g, and 200g parts.  Using gravity,
-           a simple 2-point calibration yields acceptable results capturing both
-           the different sensitivities and ranges of the different accelerometer
-           parts and any variation in power supply voltages or resistor values
-           in the divider network.
-         </para>
-         <para>
-           To calibrate the acceleration sensor, use the 'c a 0' command.  You
-           will be prompted to orient the board vertically with the UHF antenna
-           up and press a key, then to orient the board vertically with the
-           UHF antenna down and press a key.
-           As with all 'c' sub-commands, follow this with a 'c w' to write the
-           change to the parameter block in the on-board DataFlash chip.
-         </para>
-         <para>
-           The +1g and -1g calibration points are included in each telemetry
-           frame and are part of the header extracted by ao-dumplog after flight.
-           Note that we always store and return raw ADC samples for each
-           sensor... nothing is permanently "lost" or "damaged" if the
-           calibration is poor.
-         </para>
-         <para>
-          In the unlikely event an accel cal that goes badly, it is possible
-          that TeleMetrum may always come up in 'pad mode' and as such not be
-          listening to either the USB or radio link.  If that happens,
-          there is a special hook in the firmware to force the board back
-          in to 'idle mode' so you can re-do the cal.  To use this hook, you
-          just need to ground the SPI clock pin at power-on.  This pin is
-          available as pin 2 on the 8-pin companion connector, and pin 1 is
-          ground.  So either carefully install a fine-gauge wire jumper
-          between the two pins closest to the index hole end of the 8-pin
-          connector, or plug in the programming cable to the 8-pin connector
-          and use a small screwdriver or similar to short the two pins closest
-          to the index post on the 4-pin end of the programming cable, and
-          power up the board.  It should come up in 'idle mode' (two beeps).
-         </para>
-       </section>
-     </section>
  
    </chapter>
    <chapter>