significant update
authorBdale Garbee <bdale@gag.com>
Tue, 20 Jul 2010 08:12:03 +0000 (02:12 -0600)
committerBdale Garbee <bdale@gag.com>
Tue, 20 Jul 2010 08:12:03 +0000 (02:12 -0600)
doc/Makefile
doc/telemetrum-doc.xsl [new file with mode: 0644]
doc/telemetrum.xsl [deleted file]

index 55b7a54..f8048dc 100644 (file)
@@ -2,24 +2,30 @@
 #      http://docbook.sourceforge.net/release/xsl/current/README
 #
 
-all:   telemetrum.html telemetrum.pdf
+all:   telemetrum-doc.html telemetrum-doc.pdf
 
-telemetrum.html:       telemetrum.xsl
-       xsltproc -o telemetrum.html \
+publish:       all
+       cp telemetrum-doc.html \
+               telemetrum-doc.pdf /home/bdale/web/altusmetrum/TeleMetrum/doc/
+       (cd /home/bdale/web/altusmetrum ; echo "update docs" | git commit -F - /home/bdale/web/altusmetrum/TeleMetrum/doc/* ; git push)
+
+
+telemetrum-doc.html:   telemetrum-doc.xsl
+       xsltproc -o telemetrum-doc.html \
                /usr/share/xml/docbook/stylesheet/docbook-xsl/html/docbook.xsl \
-               telemetrum.xsl
+               telemetrum-doc.xsl
 
-telemetrum.fo: telemetrum.xsl
-       xsltproc -o telemetrum.fo \
+telemetrum-doc.fo:     telemetrum-doc.xsl
+       xsltproc -o telemetrum-doc.fo \
                /usr/share/xml/docbook/stylesheet/docbook-xsl/fo/docbook.xsl \
-               telemetrum.xsl
+               telemetrum-doc.xsl
 
-telemetrum.pdf:        telemetrum.fo
-       fop -fo telemetrum.fo -pdf telemetrum.pdf
+telemetrum-doc.pdf:    telemetrum-doc.fo
+       fop -fo telemetrum-doc.fo -pdf telemetrum-doc.pdf
 
 clean:
-       rm -f telemetrum.html telemetrum.pdf telemetrum.fo
+       rm -f telemetrum-doc.html telemetrum-doc.pdf telemetrum-doc.fo
 
-indent:                telemetrum.xsl
-       xmlindent -i 2 < telemetrum.xsl > telemetrum.new
+indent:                telemetrum-doc.xsl
+       xmlindent -i 2 < telemetrum-doc.xsl > telemetrum-doc.new
 
diff --git a/doc/telemetrum-doc.xsl b/doc/telemetrum-doc.xsl
new file mode 100644 (file)
index 0000000..b7963ae
--- /dev/null
@@ -0,0 +1,909 @@
+<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8" ?>
+<!DOCTYPE book PUBLIC "-//OASIS//DTD DocBook XML V4.5//EN"
+  "/usr/share/xml/docbook/schema/dtd/4.5/docbookx.dtd">
+<book>
+  <title>TeleMetrum</title>
+  <subtitle>Owner's Manual for the TeleMetrum System</subtitle>
+  <bookinfo>
+    <author>
+      <firstname>Bdale</firstname>
+      <surname>Garbee</surname>
+    </author>
+    <author>
+      <firstname>Keith</firstname>
+      <surname>Packard</surname>
+    </author>
+    <copyright>
+      <year>2010</year>
+      <holder>Bdale Garbee and Keith Packard</holder>
+    </copyright>
+    <legalnotice>
+      <para>
+        This document is released under the terms of the 
+        <ulink url="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/">
+          Creative Commons ShareAlike 3.0
+        </ulink>
+        license.
+      </para>
+    </legalnotice>
+    <revhistory>
+      <revision>
+        <revnumber>0.2</revnumber>
+        <date>18 July 2010</date>
+        <revremark>Significant update</revremark>
+      </revision>
+      <revision>
+        <revnumber>0.1</revnumber>
+        <date>30 March 2010</date>
+        <revremark>Initial content</revremark>
+      </revision>
+    </revhistory>
+  </bookinfo>
+  <chapter>
+    <title>Introduction and Overview</title>
+    <para>
+      Welcome to the Altus Metrum community!  Our circuits and software reflect
+      our passion for both hobby rocketry and Free Software.  We hope their
+      capabilities and performance will delight you in every way, but by
+      releasing all of our hardware and software designs under open licenses,
+      we also hope to empower you to take as active a role in our collective
+      future as you wish!
+    </para>
+    <para>
+      The focal point of our community is TeleMetrum, a dual deploy altimeter 
+      with fully integrated GPS and radio telemetry as standard features, and
+      a "companion interface" that will support optional capabilities in the 
+      future.
+    </para>
+    <para>    
+      Complementing TeleMetrum is TeleDongle, a USB to RF interface for 
+      communicating with TeleMetrum.  Combined with your choice of antenna and 
+      notebook computer, TeleDongle and our associated user interface software
+      form a complete ground station capable of logging and displaying in-flight
+      telemetry, aiding rocket recovery, then processing and archiving flight
+      data for analysis and review.
+    </para>
+    <para>
+      More products will be added to the Altus Metrum family over time, and
+      we currently envision that this will be a single, comprehensive manual
+      for the entire product family.
+    </para>
+  </chapter>
+  <chapter>
+    <title>Getting Started</title>
+    <para>
+      This chapter began as "The Mere-Mortals Quick Start/Usage Guide to 
+      the Altus Metrum Starter Kit" by Bob Finch, W9YA, NAR 12965, TRA 12350, 
+      w9ya@amsat.org.  Bob was one of our first customers for a production
+      TeleMetrum, and the enthusiasm that led to his contribution of this
+      section is immensely gratifying and highy appreciated!
+    </para>
+    <para>
+      The first thing to do after you check the inventory of parts in your 
+      "starter kit" is to charge the battery by plugging it into the 
+      corresponding socket of the TeleMetrum and then using the USB A to B 
+      cable to plug the Telemetrum into your computer's USB socket. The 
+      TeleMetrum circuitry will charge the battery whenever it is plugged 
+      into the usb socket. The TeleMetrum's on-off switch does NOT control 
+      the charging circuitry.  When the GPS chip is initially searching for
+      satellites, the unit will pull more current than it can pull from the
+      usb port, so the battery must be plugged in order to get a good 
+      satellite lock.  Once GPS is locked the current consumption goes back 
+      down enough to enable charging while 
+      running. So it's a good idea to fully charge the battery as your 
+      first item of business so there is no issue getting and maintaining 
+      satellite lock.  The yellow charge indicator led will go out when the 
+      battery is nearly full and the charger goes to trickle charge.
+    </para>
+    <para>
+      The other active device in the starter kit is the half-duplex TeleDongle 
+      rf link.  If you plug it in to your computer it should "just work",
+      showing up as a serial port device.  If you are using Linux and are
+      having problems, try moving to a fresher kernel (2.6.33 or newer), as
+      there were some ugly USB serial driver bugs in earlier versions.
+    </para>
+    <para>
+      Next you should obtain and install the AltOS utilities.  The first
+      generation sofware was written for Linux only.  New software is coming
+      soon that will also run on Windows and Mac.  For now, we'll concentrate
+      on Linux.  If you are using Debian, an 'altos' package already exists, 
+      see http://altusmetrum.org/AltOS for details on how to install it.
+      User-contributed directions for building packages on ArchLinux may be 
+      found in the contrib/arch-linux directory as PKGBUILD files.
+      Between the debian/rules file and the PKGBUILD files in 
+      contrib, you should find enough information to learn how to build the 
+      software for any other version of Linux.
+    </para>
+    <para>
+      When you have successfully installed the software suite (either from 
+      compiled source code or as the pre-built Debian package) you will 
+      have 10 or so executable programs all of which have names beginning 
+       with 'ao-'.
+      ('ao-view' is the lone GUI-based program, the rest are command-line 
+      oriented.) You will also have man pages, that give you basic info 
+       on each program.
+      You will also get this documentation in two file types in the doc/ 
+directory, telemetrum-doc.pdf and telemetrum-doc.html.
+      Finally you will have a couple control files that allow the ao-view 
+      GUI-based program to appear in your menu of programs (under 
+      the 'Internet' category). 
+    </para>
+    <para>
+      Both Telemetrum and TeleDongle can be directly communicated 
+      with using USB ports. The first thing you should try after getting 
+      both units plugged into to your computer's usb port(s) is to run 
+      'ao-list' from a terminal-window to see what port-device-name each 
+       device has been assigned by the operating system. 
+      You will need this information to access the devices via their 
+      respective on-board firmware and data using other command line
+      programs in the AltOS software suite.
+    </para>
+    <para>
+      To access the device's firmware for configuration you need a terminal
+      program such as you would use to talk to a modem.  The software 
+      authors prefer using the program 'cu' which comes from the UUCP package
+      on most Unix-like systems such as Linux.  An example command line for
+      cu might be 'cu -l /dev/ttyACM0', substituting the correct number 
+      indicated from running the
+      ao-list program.  Another reasonable terminal program for Linux is
+      'cutecom'.  The default 'escape' 
+      character used by CU (i.e. the character you use to
+      issue commands to cu itself instead of sending the command as input 
+      to the connected device) is a '~'. You will need this for use in 
+      only two different ways during normal operations. First is to exit 
+      the program by sending a '~.' which is called a 'escape-disconnect' 
+      and allows you to close-out from 'cu'. The
+      second use will be outlined later.
+    </para>
+    <para>
+      Both TeleMetrum and TeleDongle share the concept of a two level 
+      command set in their firmware.  
+       The first layer has several single letter commands. Once 
+      you are using 'cu' (or 'cutecom') sending (typing) a '?' 
+      returns a full list of these
+      commands. The second level are configuration sub-commands accessed 
+      using the 'c' command, for 
+      instance typing 'c?' will give you this second level of commands 
+      (all of which require the
+      letter 'c' to access).  Please note that most configuration options
+      are stored only in DataFlash memory, and only TeleMetrum has this
+      memory to save the various values entered like the channel number 
+      and your callsign when powered off.  TeleDongle requires that you
+      set these each time you plug it in, which ao-view can help with.
+    </para>
+    <para>
+      Try setting these config ('c' or second level menu) values.  A good
+      place to start is by setting your call sign.  By default, the boards
+      use 'N0CALL' which is cute, but not exactly legal!
+      Spend a few minutes getting comfortable with the units, their 
+      firmware, and 'cu' (or possibly 'cutecom').
+       For instance, try to send 
+      (type) a 'c r 2' and verify the channel change by sending a 'c s'. 
+      Verify you can connect and disconnect from the units while in your
+      terminal program by sending the escape-disconnect mentioned above.
+    </para>
+    <para>
+      Note that the 'reboot' command, which is very useful on TeleMetrum, 
+      will likely just cause problems with the dongle.  The *correct* way
+      to reset the dongle is just to unplug and re-plug it.
+    </para>
+    <para>
+      A fun thing to do at the launch site and something you can do while 
+      learning how to use these units is to play with the rf-link access 
+      of the TeleMetrum from the TeleDongle.  Be aware that you *must* create
+      some physical separation between the devices, otherwise the link will 
+      not function due to signal overload in the receivers in each device.
+    </para>
+    <para>
+      Now might be a good time to take a break and read the rest of this
+      manual, particularly about the two "modes" that the TeleMetrum 
+      can be placed in and how the position of the TeleMetrum when booting 
+      up will determine whether the unit is in "pad" or "idle" mode.
+    </para>
+    <para>
+      You can access a TeleMetrum in idle mode from the Teledongle's USB 
+      connection using the rf link
+      by issuing a 'p' command to the TeleDongle. Practice connecting and
+      disconnecting ('~~' while using 'cu') from the TeleMetrum.  If 
+      you cannot escape out of the "p" command, (by using a '~~' when in 
+      CU) then it is likely that your kernel has issues.  Try a newer version.
+    </para>
+    <para>
+      Using this rf link allows you to configure the TeleMetrum, test 
+      fire e-matches and igniters from the flight line, check pyro-match 
+      continuity and so forth. You can leave the unit turned on while it 
+      is in 'idle mode' and then place the
+      rocket vertically on the launch pad, walk away and then issue a 
+      reboot command.  The TeleMetrum will reboot and start sending data 
+      having changed to the "pad" mode. If the TeleDongle is not receiving 
+      this data, you can disconnect 'cu' from the Teledongle using the 
+      procedures mentioned above and THEN connect to the TeleDongle from 
+      inside 'ao-view'. If this doesn't work, disconnect from the
+      TeleDongle, unplug it, and try again after plugging it back in.
+    </para>
+    <para>
+      Eventually the GPS will find enough satellites, lock in on them, 
+      and 'ao-view' will both auditorially announce and visually indicate 
+      that GPS is ready.
+      Now you can launch knowing that you have a good data path and 
+      good satellite lock for flight data and recovery.  Remember 
+      you MUST tell ao-view to connect to the TeleDongle explicitly in 
+      order for ao-view to be able to receive data.
+    </para>
+    <para>
+      Both RDF (radio direction finding) tones from the TeleMetrum and 
+      GPS trekking data are available and together are very useful in 
+      locating the rocket once it has landed. (The last good GPS data 
+      received before touch-down will be on the data screen of 'ao-view'.)
+    </para>
+    <para>
+      Once you have recovered the rocket you can download the eeprom 
+      contents using either 'ao-dumplog' (or possibly 'ao-eeprom'), over
+      either a USB cable or over the radio link using TeleDongle.
+      And by following the man page for 'ao-postflight' you can create 
+      various data output reports, graphs, and even kml data to see the 
+      flight trajectory in google-earth. (Moving the viewing angle making 
+      sure to connect the yellow lines while in google-earth is the proper
+      technique.)
+    </para>
+    <para>
+      As for ao-view.... some things are in the menu but don't do anything 
+      very useful.  The developers have stopped working on ao-view to focus
+      on a new, cross-platform ground station program.  So ao-view may or 
+       may not be updated in the future.  Mostly you just use 
+      the Log and Device menus.  It has a wonderful display of the incoming 
+      flight data and I am sure you will enjoy what it has to say to you 
+      once you enable the voice output!
+    </para>
+    <section>
+      <title>FAQ</title>
+      <para>
+        The altimeter (TeleMetrum) seems to shut off when disconnected from the
+        computer.  Make sure the battery is adequately charged.  Remember the
+        unit will pull more power than the USB port can deliver before the 
+        GPS enters "locked" mode.  The battery charges best when TeleMetrum
+        is turned off.
+      </para>
+      <para>
+        It's impossible to stop the TeleDongle when it's in "p" mode, I have
+        to unplug the USB cable?  Make sure you have tried to "escape out" of 
+        this mode.  If this doesn't work the reboot procedure for the 
+        TeleDongle *is* to simply unplug it. 'cu' however will retain it's 
+        outgoing buffer IF your "escape out" ('~~') does not work. 
+        At this point using either 'ao-view' (or possibly
+        'cutemon') instead of 'cu' will 'clear' the issue and allow renewed
+        communication.
+      </para>
+      <para>
+        The amber LED (on the TeleMetrum/altimeter) lights up when both 
+        battery and USB are connected. Does this mean it's charging? 
+        Yes, the yellow LED indicates the charging at the 'regular' rate. 
+        If the led is out but the unit is still plugged into a USB port, 
+        then the battery is being charged at a 'trickle' rate.
+      </para>
+      <para>
+        There are no "dit-dah-dah-dit" sound like the manual mentions?
+        That's the "pad" mode.  Weak batteries might be the problem.
+        It is also possible that the unit is horizontal and the output 
+        is instead a "dit-dit" meaning 'idle'.
+      </para>
+      <para>
+        It's unclear how to use 'ao-view' and other programs when 'cu' 
+        is running. You cannot have more than one program connected to 
+        the TeleDongle at one time without apparent data loss as the 
+        incoming data will not make it to both programs intact. 
+        Disconnect whatever programs aren't currently being used.
+      </para>
+      <para>
+        How do I save flight data?   
+        Live telemetry is written to file(s) whenever 'ao-view' is connected 
+        to the TeleDongle.  The file area defaults to ~/altos
+        but is easily changed using the menus in 'ao-view'. The files that 
+       are written end in '.telem'. The after-flight
+        data-dumped files will end in .eeprom and represent continuous data 
+        unlike the rf-linked .telem files that are subject to the 
+        turnarounds/data-packaging time slots in the half-duplex rf data path. 
+        See the above instructions on what and how to save the eeprom stored 
+        data after physically retrieving your TeleMetrum.  Make sure to save
+       the on-board data after each flight, as the current firmware will
+       over-write any previous flight data during a new flight.
+        </para>
+      </section>
+    </chapter>
+    <chapter>
+      <title>Specifications</title>
+      <itemizedlist>
+        <listitem>
+          <para>
+            Recording altimeter for model rocketry.
+          </para>
+        </listitem>
+        <listitem>
+          <para>
+            Supports dual deployment (can fire 2 ejection charges).
+          </para>
+        </listitem>
+        <listitem>
+          <para>
+            70cm ham-band transceiver for telemetry downlink.
+          </para>
+        </listitem>
+        <listitem>
+          <para>
+            Barometric pressure sensor good to 45k feet MSL.
+          </para>
+        </listitem>
+        <listitem>
+          <para>
+            1-axis high-g accelerometer for motor characterization, capable of 
+            +/- 50g using default part.
+          </para>
+        </listitem>
+        <listitem>
+          <para>
+            On-board, integrated GPS receiver with 5hz update rate capability.
+          </para>
+        </listitem>
+        <listitem>
+          <para>
+            On-board 1 megabyte non-volatile memory for flight data storage.
+          </para>
+        </listitem>
+        <listitem>
+          <para>
+            USB interface for battery charging, configuration, and data recovery.
+          </para>
+        </listitem>
+        <listitem>
+          <para>
+            Fully integrated support for LiPo rechargeable batteries.
+          </para>
+        </listitem>
+        <listitem>
+          <para>
+            Uses LiPo to fire e-matches, support for optional separate pyro 
+            battery if needed.
+          </para>
+        </listitem>
+        <listitem>
+          <para>
+            2.75 x 1 inch board designed to fit inside 29mm airframe coupler tube.
+          </para>
+        </listitem>
+      </itemizedlist>
+    </chapter>
+    <chapter>
+      <title>Handling Precautions</title>
+      <para>
+        TeleMetrum is a sophisticated electronic device.  When handled gently and
+        properly installed in an airframe, it will deliver impressive results.
+        However, like all electronic devices, there are some precautions you
+        must take.
+      </para>
+      <para>
+        The Lithium Polymer rechargeable batteries used with TeleMetrum have an 
+        extraordinary power density.  This is great because we can fly with
+        much less battery mass than if we used alkaline batteries or previous
+        generation rechargeable batteries... but if they are punctured 
+        or their leads are allowed to short, they can and will release their 
+        energy very rapidly!
+        Thus we recommend that you take some care when handling our batteries 
+        and consider giving them some extra protection in your airframe.  We 
+        often wrap them in suitable scraps of closed-cell packing foam before 
+        strapping them down, for example.
+      </para>
+      <para>
+        The TeleMetrum barometric sensor is sensitive to sunlight.  In normal 
+        mounting situations, it and all of the other surface mount components 
+        are "down" towards whatever the underlying mounting surface is, so
+        this is not normally a problem.  Please consider this, though, when
+        designing an installation, for example, in a 29mm airframe with a 
+       see-through plastic payload bay.
+      </para>
+      <para>
+        The TeleMetrum barometric sensor sampling port must be able to 
+       "breathe",
+        both by not being covered by foam or tape or other materials that might
+        directly block the hole on the top of the sensor, but also by having a
+        suitable static vent to outside air.  
+      </para>
+      <para>
+        As with all other rocketry electronics, TeleMetrum must be protected 
+        from exposure to corrosive motor exhaust and ejection charge gasses.
+      </para>
+    </chapter>
+    <chapter>
+      <title>Hardware Overview</title>
+      <para>
+        TeleMetrum is a 1 inch by 2.75 inch circuit board.  It was designed to
+        fit inside coupler for 29mm airframe tubing, but using it in a tube that
+        small in diameter may require some creativity in mounting and wiring 
+        to succeed!  The default 1/4
+        wave UHF wire antenna attached to the center of the nose-cone end of
+        the board is about 7 inches long, and wiring for a power switch and
+        the e-matches for apogee and main ejection charges depart from the 
+        fin can end of the board.  Given all this, an ideal "simple" avionics 
+        bay for TeleMetrum should have at least 10 inches of interior length.
+      </para>
+      <para>
+        A typical TeleMetrum installation using the on-board GPS antenna and
+        default wire UHF antenna involves attaching only a suitable
+        Lithium Polymer battery, a single pole switch for power on/off, and 
+        two pairs of wires connecting e-matches for the apogee and main ejection
+        charges.  
+      </para>
+      <para>
+        By default, we use the unregulated output of the LiPo battery directly
+        to fire ejection charges.  This works marvelously with standard 
+        low-current e-matches like the J-Tek from MJG Technologies, and with 
+        Quest Q2G2 igniters.  However, if you
+        want or need to use a separate pyro battery, you can do so by adding
+        a second 2mm connector to position B2 on the board and cutting the
+        thick pcb trace connecting the LiPo battery to the pyro circuit between
+        the two silk screen marks on the surface mount side of the board shown
+        here [insert photo]
+      </para>
+      <para>
+        We offer two choices of pyro and power switch connector, or you can 
+        choose neither and solder wires directly to the board.  All three choices
+        are reasonable depending on the constraints of your airframe.  Our
+        favorite option when there is sufficient room above the board is to use
+        the Tyco pin header with polarization and locking.  If you choose this
+        option, you crimp individual wires for the power switch and e-matches
+        into a mating connector, and installing and removing the TeleMetrum
+        board from an airframe is as easy as plugging or unplugging two 
+        connectors.  If the airframe will not support this much height or if
+        you want to be able to directly attach e-match leads to the board, we
+        offer a screw terminal block.  This is very similar to what most other
+        altimeter vendors provide and so may be the most familiar option.  
+       You'll need a very small straight blade screwdriver to connect
+        and disconnect the board in this case, such as you might find in a
+        jeweler's screwdriver set.  Finally, you can forego both options and
+        solder wires directly to the board, which may be the best choice for
+        minimum diameter and/or minimum mass designs. 
+      </para>
+      <para>
+        For most airframes, the integrated GPS antenna and wire UHF antenna are
+        a great combination.  However, if you are installing in a carbon-fiber
+        electronics bay which is opaque to RF signals, you may need to use 
+        off-board external antennas instead.  In this case, you can order
+        TeleMetrum with an SMA connector for the UHF antenna connection, and
+        you can unplug the integrated GPS antenna and select an appropriate 
+        off-board GPS antenna with cable terminating in a U.FL connector.
+      </para>
+    </chapter>
+    <chapter>
+      <title>Operation</title>
+      <section>
+        <title>Firmware Modes </title>
+        <para>
+          The AltOS firmware build for TeleMetrum has two fundamental modes,
+          "idle" and "flight".  Which of these modes the firmware operates in
+          is determined by the orientation of the rocket (well, actually the
+          board, of course...) at the time power is switched on.  If the rocket
+          is "nose up", then TeleMetrum assumes it's on a rail or rod being
+          prepared for launch, so the firmware chooses flight mode.  However,
+          if the rocket is more or less horizontal, the firmware instead enters
+          idle mode.
+        </para>
+        <para>
+          At power on, you will hear three beeps 
+         ("S" in Morse code for startup) and then a pause while 
+          TeleMetrum completes initialization and self tests, and decides which
+          mode to enter next.
+        </para>
+        <para>
+          In flight or "pad" mode, TeleMetrum turns on the GPS system, 
+         engages the flight
+          state machine, goes into transmit-only mode on the RF link sending 
+          telemetry, and waits for launch to be detected.  Flight mode is
+          indicated by an audible "di-dah-dah-dit" ("P" for pad) on the 
+          beeper, followed by
+          beeps indicating the state of the pyrotechnic igniter continuity.
+          One beep indicates apogee continuity, two beeps indicate
+          main continuity, three beeps indicate both apogee and main continuity,
+          and one longer "brap" sound indicates no continuity.  For a dual
+          deploy flight, make sure you're getting three beeps before launching!
+          For apogee-only or motor eject flights, do what makes sense.
+        </para>
+        <para>
+          In idle mode, you will hear an audible "di-dit" ("I" for idle), and
+          the normal flight state machine is disengaged, thus
+          no ejection charges will fire.  TeleMetrum also listens on the RF
+          link when in idle mode for packet mode requests sent from TeleDongle.
+          Commands can be issued to a TeleMetrum in idle mode over either
+          USB or the RF link equivalently.
+          Idle mode is useful for configuring TeleMetrum, for extracting data 
+          from the on-board storage chip after flight, and for ground testing
+          pyro charges.
+        </para>
+        <para>
+          One "neat trick" of particular value when TeleMetrum is used with very
+          large airframes, is that you can power the board up while the rocket
+          is horizontal, such that it comes up in idle mode.  Then you can 
+          raise the airframe to launch position, use a TeleDongle to open
+          a packet connection, and issue a 'reset' command which will cause
+          TeleMetrum to reboot, realize it's now nose-up, and thus choose
+          flight mode.  This is much safer than standing on the top step of a
+          rickety step-ladder or hanging off the side of a launch tower with
+          a screw-driver trying to turn on your avionics before installing
+          igniters!
+        </para>
+      </section>
+      <section>
+        <title>GPS </title>
+        <para>
+          TeleMetrum includes a complete GPS receiver.  See a later section for
+          a brief explanation of how GPS works that will help you understand
+          the information in the telemetry stream.  The bottom line is that
+          the TeleMetrum GPS receiver needs to lock onto at least four 
+          satellites to obtain a solid 3 dimensional position fix and know 
+          what time it is!
+        </para>
+        <para>
+          TeleMetrum provides backup power to the GPS chip any time a LiPo
+          battery is connected.  This allows the receiver to "warm start" on
+          the launch rail much faster than if every power-on were a "cold start"
+          for the GPS receiver.  In typical operations, powering up TeleMetrum
+          on the flight line in idle mode while performing final airframe
+          preparation will be sufficient to allow the GPS receiver to cold
+          start and acquire lock.  Then the board can be powered down during
+          RSO review and installation on a launch rod or rail.  When the board
+          is turned back on, the GPS system should lock very quickly, typically
+          long before igniter installation and return to the flight line are
+          complete.
+        </para>
+      </section>
+      <section>
+        <title>Ground Testing </title>
+        <para>
+          An important aspect of preparing a rocket using electronic deployment
+          for flight is ground testing the recovery system.  Thanks
+          to the bi-directional RF link central to the Altus Metrum system, 
+          this can be accomplished in a TeleMetrum-equipped rocket without as
+          much work as you may be accustomed to with other systems.  It can
+          even be fun!
+        </para>
+        <para>
+          Just prep the rocket for flight, then power up TeleMetrum while the
+          airframe is horizontal.  This will cause the firmware to go into 
+          "idle" mode, in which the normal flight state machine is disabled and
+          charges will not fire without manual command.  Then, establish an
+          RF packet connection from a TeleDongle-equipped computer using the 
+          P command from a safe distance.  You can now command TeleMetrum to
+          fire the apogee or main charges to complete your testing.
+        </para>
+        <para>
+          In order to reduce the chance of accidental firing of pyrotechnic
+          charges, the command to fire a charge is intentionally somewhat
+          difficult to type, and the built-in help is slightly cryptic to 
+          prevent accidental echoing of characters from the help text back at
+          the board from firing a charge.  The command to fire the apogee
+          drogue charge is 'i DoIt drogue' and the command to fire the main
+          charge is 'i DoIt main'.
+        </para>
+      </section>
+      <section>
+        <title>Radio Link </title>
+        <para>
+          The chip our boards are based on incorporates an RF transceiver, but
+          it's not a full duplex system... each end can only be transmitting or
+          receiving at any given moment.  So we had to decide how to manage the
+          link.
+        </para>
+        <para>
+          By design, TeleMetrum firmware listens for an RF connection when
+          it's in "idle mode" (turned on while the rocket is horizontal), which
+          allows us to use the RF link to configure the rocket, do things like
+          ejection tests, and extract data after a flight without having to 
+          crack open the airframe.  However, when the board is in "flight 
+          mode" (turned on when the rocket is vertical) the TeleMetrum only 
+          transmits and doesn't listen at all.  That's because we want to put 
+          ultimate priority on event detection and getting telemetry out of 
+          the rocket and out over
+          the RF link in case the rocket crashes and we aren't able to extract
+          data later... 
+        </para>
+        <para>
+          We don't use a 'normal packet radio' mode because they're just too
+          inefficient.  The GFSK modulation we use is just FSK with the 
+          baseband pulses passed through a
+          Gaussian filter before they go into the modulator to limit the
+          transmitted bandwidth.  When combined with the hardware forward error
+          correction support in the cc1111 chip, this allows us to have a very
+          robust 38.4 kilobit data link with only 10 milliwatts of transmit power,
+          a whip antenna in the rocket, and a hand-held Yagi on the ground.  We've
+          had flights to above 21k feet AGL with good reception, and calculations
+          suggest we should be good to well over 40k feet AGL with a 5-element yagi on
+          the ground.  We hope to fly boards to higher altitudes soon, and would
+          of course appreciate customer feedback on performance in higher
+          altitude flights!
+        </para>
+      </section>
+      <section>
+        <title>Configurable Parameters</title>
+        <para>
+          Configuring a TeleMetrum board for flight is very simple.  Because we
+          have both acceleration and pressure sensors, there is no need to set
+          a "mach delay", for example.  The few configurable parameters can all
+          be set using a simple terminal program over the USB port or RF link
+          via TeleDongle.
+        </para>
+        <section>
+          <title>Radio Channel</title>
+          <para>
+            Our firmware supports 10 channels.  The default channel 0 corresponds
+            to a center frequency of 434.550 Mhz, and channels are spaced every 
+            100 khz.  Thus, channel 1 is 434.650 Mhz, and channel 9 is 435.550 Mhz.
+            At any given launch, we highly recommend coordinating who will use
+            each channel and when to avoid interference.  And of course, both 
+            TeleMetrum and TeleDongle must be configured to the same channel to
+            successfully communicate with each other.
+          </para>
+          <para>
+            To set the radio channel, use the 'c r' command, like 'c r 3' to set
+            channel 3.  
+            As with all 'c' sub-commands, follow this with a 'c w' to write the 
+            change to the parameter block in the on-board DataFlash chip on
+       your TeleMetrum board if you want the change to stay in place across reboots.
+          </para>
+        </section>
+        <section>
+          <title>Apogee Delay</title>
+          <para>
+            Apogee delay is the number of seconds after TeleMetrum detects flight
+            apogee that the drogue charge should be fired.  In most cases, this
+            should be left at the default of 0.  However, if you are flying
+            redundant electronics such as for an L3 certification, you may wish 
+            to set one of your altimeters to a positive delay so that both 
+            primary and backup pyrotechnic charges do not fire simultaneously.
+          </para>
+          <para>
+            To set the apogee delay, use the [FIXME] command.
+            As with all 'c' sub-commands, follow this with a 'c w' to write the 
+            change to the parameter block in the on-board DataFlash chip.
+          </para>
+          <para>
+       Please note that the TeleMetrum apogee detection algorithm always
+       fires a fraction of a second *after* apogee.  If you are also flying
+       an altimeter like the PerfectFlite MAWD, which only supports selecting
+       0 or 1 seconds of apogee delay, you may wish to set the MAWD to 0
+       seconds delay and set the TeleMetrum to fire your backup 2 or 3
+       seconds later to avoid any chance of both charges firing 
+       simultaneously.  We've flown several airframes this way quite happily,
+       including Keith's successful L3 cert.
+          </para>
+        </section>
+        <section>
+          <title>Main Deployment Altitude</title>
+          <para>
+            By default, TeleMetrum will fire the main deployment charge at an
+            elevation of 250 meters (about 820 feet) above ground.  We think this
+            is a good elevation for most airframes, but feel free to change this 
+            to suit.  In particular, if you are flying two altimeters, you may
+            wish to set the
+            deployment elevation for the backup altimeter to be something lower
+            than the primary so that both pyrotechnic charges don't fire
+            simultaneously.
+          </para>
+          <para>
+            To set the main deployment altitude, use the [FIXME] command.
+            As with all 'c' sub-commands, follow this with a 'c w' to write the 
+            change to the parameter block in the on-board DataFlash chip.
+          </para>
+        </section>
+      </section>
+      <section>
+        <title>Calibration</title>
+        <para>
+          There are only two calibrations required for a TeleMetrum board, and
+          only one for TeleDongle.
+        </para>
+        <section>
+          <title>Radio Frequency</title>
+          <para>
+            The radio frequency is synthesized from a clock based on the 48 Mhz
+            crystal on the board.  The actual frequency of this oscillator must be
+            measured to generate a calibration constant.  While our GFSK modulation
+            bandwidth is wide enough to allow boards to communicate even when 
+            their oscillators are not on exactly the same frequency, performance
+            is best when they are closely matched.
+            Radio frequency calibration requires a calibrated frequency counter.
+            Fortunately, once set, the variation in frequency due to aging and
+            temperature changes is small enough that re-calibration by customers
+            should generally not be required.
+          </para>
+          <para>
+            To calibrate the radio frequency, connect the UHF antenna port to a
+            frequency counter, set the board to channel 0, and use the 'C' 
+            command to generate a CW carrier.  Wait for the transmitter temperature
+            to stabilize and the frequency to settle down.  
+            Then, divide 434.550 Mhz by the 
+            measured frequency and multiply by the current radio cal value show
+            in the 'c s' command.  For an unprogrammed board, the default value
+            is 1186611.  Take the resulting integer and program it using the 'c f'
+            command.  Testing with the 'C' command again should show a carrier
+            within a few tens of Hertz of the intended frequency.
+            As with all 'c' sub-commands, follow this with a 'c w' to write the 
+            change to the parameter block in the on-board DataFlash chip.
+          </para>
+        </section>
+        <section>
+          <title>Accelerometer</title>
+          <para>
+            The accelerometer we use has its own 5 volt power supply and
+            the output must be passed through a resistive voltage divider to match
+            the input of our 3.3 volt ADC.  This means that unlike the barometric
+            sensor, the output of the acceleration sensor is not ratiometric to 
+            the ADC converter, and calibration is required.  We also support the 
+            use of any of several accelerometers from a Freescale family that 
+            includes at least +/- 40g, 50g, 100g, and 200g parts.  Using gravity,
+            a simple 2-point calibration yields acceptable results capturing both
+            the different sensitivities and ranges of the different accelerometer
+            parts and any variation in power supply voltages or resistor values
+            in the divider network.
+          </para>
+          <para>
+            To calibrate the acceleration sensor, use the 'c a 0' command.  You
+            will be prompted to orient the board vertically with the UHF antenna
+            up and press a key, then to orient the board vertically with the 
+            UHF antenna down and press a key.
+            As with all 'c' sub-commands, follow this with a 'c w' to write the 
+            change to the parameter block in the on-board DataFlash chip.
+          </para>
+          <para>
+            The +1g and -1g calibration points are included in each telemetry
+            frame and are part of the header extracted by ao-dumplog after flight.
+            Note that we always store and return raw ADC samples for each
+            sensor... nothing is permanently "lost" or "damaged" if the 
+            calibration is poor.
+          </para>
+        </section>
+      </section>
+    </chapter>
+    <chapter>
+      <title>Using Altus Metrum Products</title>
+      <section>
+        <title>Being Legal</title>
+        <para>
+          First off, in the US, you need an [amateur radio license](../Radio) or 
+          other authorization to legally operate the radio transmitters that are part
+          of our products.
+        </para>
+        <section>
+          <title>In the Rocket</title>
+          <para>
+            In the rocket itself, you just need a [TeleMetrum](../TeleMetrum) board and 
+            a LiPo rechargeable battery.  An 860mAh battery weighs less than a 9V 
+            alkaline battery, and will run a [TeleMetrum](../TeleMetrum) for hours.
+          </para>
+          <para>
+            By default, we ship TeleMetrum with a simple wire antenna.  If your 
+            electronics bay or the airframe it resides within is made of carbon fiber, 
+            which is opaque to RF signals, you may choose to have an SMA connector 
+            installed so that you can run a coaxial cable to an antenna mounted 
+            elsewhere in the rocket.
+          </para>
+        </section>
+        <section>
+          <title>On the Ground</title>
+          <para>
+            To receive the data stream from the rocket, you need an antenna and short 
+            feedline connected to one of our [TeleDongle](../TeleDongle) units.  The
+            TeleDongle in turn plugs directly into the USB port on a notebook 
+            computer.  Because TeleDongle looks like a simple serial port, your computer
+            does not require special device drivers... just plug it in.
+          </para>
+          <para>
+            Right now, all of our application software is written for Linux.  However, 
+            because we understand that many people run Windows or MacOS, we are working 
+            on a new ground station program written in Java that should work on all
+            operating systems.
+          </para>
+          <para>
+            After the flight, you can use the RF link to extract the more detailed data 
+            logged in the rocket, or you can use a mini USB cable to plug into the 
+            TeleMetrum board directly.  Pulling out the data without having to open up
+            the rocket is pretty cool!  A USB cable is also how you charge the LiPo 
+            battery, so you'll want one of those anyway... the same cable used by lots 
+            of digital cameras and other modern electronic stuff will work fine.
+          </para>
+          <para>
+            If your rocket lands out of sight, you may enjoy having a hand-held GPS 
+            receiver, so that you can put in a waypoint for the last reported rocket 
+            position before touch-down.  This makes looking for your rocket a lot like 
+            Geo-Cacheing... just go to the waypoint and look around starting from there.
+          </para>
+          <para>
+            You may also enjoy having a ham radio "HT" that covers the 70cm band... you 
+            can use that with your antenna to direction-find the rocket on the ground 
+            the same way you can use a Walston or Beeline tracker.  This can be handy 
+            if the rocket is hiding in sage brush or a tree, or if the last GPS position 
+            doesn't get you close enough because the rocket dropped into a canyon, or 
+            the wind is blowing it across a dry lake bed, or something like that...  Keith
+            and Bdale both currently own and use the Yaesu VX-7R at launches.
+          </para>
+          <para>
+            So, to recap, on the ground the hardware you'll need includes:
+            <orderedlist inheritnum='inherit' numeration='arabic'>
+              <listitem> 
+                an antenna and feedline
+              </listitem>
+              <listitem> 
+                a TeleDongle
+              </listitem>
+              <listitem> 
+                a notebook computer
+              </listitem>
+              <listitem> 
+                optionally, a handheld GPS receiver
+              </listitem>
+              <listitem> 
+                optionally, an HT or receiver covering 435 Mhz
+              </listitem>
+            </orderedlist>
+          </para>
+          <para>
+            The best hand-held commercial directional antennas we've found for radio 
+            direction finding rockets are from 
+            <ulink url="http://www.arrowantennas.com/" >
+              Arrow Antennas.
+            </ulink>
+            The 440-3 and 440-5 are both good choices for finding a 
+            TeleMetrum-equipped rocket when used with a suitable 70cm HT.  
+          </para>
+        </section>
+        <section>
+          <title>Data Analysis</title>
+          <para>
+            Our software makes it easy to log the data from each flight, both the 
+            telemetry received over the RF link during the flight itself, and the more
+            complete data log recorded in the DataFlash memory on the TeleMetrum 
+            board.  Once this data is on your computer, our postflight tools make it
+            easy to quickly get to the numbers everyone wants, like apogee altitude, 
+            max acceleration, and max velocity.  You can also generate and view a 
+            standard set of plots showing the altitude, acceleration, and
+            velocity of the rocket during flight.  And you can even export a data file 
+            useable with Google Maps and Google Earth for visualizing the flight path 
+            in two or three dimensions!
+          </para>
+          <para>
+            Our ultimate goal is to emit a set of files for each flight that can be
+            published as a web page per flight, or just viewed on your local disk with 
+            a web browser.
+          </para>
+        </section>
+        <section>
+          <title>Future Plans</title>
+          <para>
+            In the future, we intend to offer "companion boards" for the rocket that will
+            plug in to TeleMetrum to collect additional data, provide more pyro channels,
+            and so forth.  A reference design for a companion board will be documented
+            soon, and will be compatible with open source Arduino programming tools.
+          </para>
+          <para>
+            We are also working on the design of a hand-held ground terminal that will
+            allow monitoring the rocket's status, collecting data during flight, and
+            logging data after flight without the need for a notebook computer on the
+            flight line.  Particularly since it is so difficult to read most notebook
+            screens in direct sunlight, we think this will be a great thing to have.
+          </para>
+          <para>
+            Because all of our work is open, both the hardware designs and the software,
+            if you have some great idea for an addition to the current Altus Metrum family,
+            feel free to dive in and help!  Or let us know what you'd like to see that 
+            we aren't already working on, and maybe we'll get excited about it too... 
+          </para>
+        </section>
+      </section>
+      <section>
+        <title>
+          How GPS Works
+        </title>
+        <para>
+          Placeholder.
+        </para>
+      </section>
+    </chapter>
+  </book>
+  
diff --git a/doc/telemetrum.xsl b/doc/telemetrum.xsl
deleted file mode 100644 (file)
index b09e029..0000000
+++ /dev/null
@@ -1,881 +0,0 @@
-<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8" ?>
-<!DOCTYPE book PUBLIC "-//OASIS//DTD DocBook XML V4.5//EN"
-  "/usr/share/xml/docbook/schema/dtd/4.5/docbookx.dtd">
-<book>
-  <title>TeleMetrum</title>
-  <subtitle>Owner's Manual for the TeleMetrum System</subtitle>
-  <bookinfo>
-    <author>
-      <firstname>Bdale</firstname>
-      <surname>Garbee</surname>
-    </author>
-    <author>
-      <firstname>Keith</firstname>
-      <surname>Packard</surname>
-    </author>
-    <copyright>
-      <year>2010</year>
-      <holder>Bdale Garbee and Keith Packard</holder>
-    </copyright>
-    <legalnotice>
-      <para>
-        This document is released under the terms of the 
-        <ulink url="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/">
-          Creative Commons ShareAlike 3.0
-        </ulink>
-        license.
-      </para>
-    </legalnotice>
-    <revhistory>
-      <revision>
-        <revnumber>0.1</revnumber>
-        <date>30 March 2010</date>
-        <revremark>Initial content</revremark>
-      </revision>
-    </revhistory>
-  </bookinfo>
-  <chapter>
-    <title>Introduction and Overview</title>
-    <para>
-      Welcome to the Altus Metrum community!  Our circuits and software reflect
-      our passion for both hobby rocketry and Free Software.  We hope their
-      capabilities and performance will delight you in every way, but by
-      releasing all of our hardware and software designs under open licenses,
-      we also hope to empower you to take as active a role in our collective
-      future as you wish!
-    </para>
-    <para>
-      The focal point of our community is TeleMetrum, a dual deploy altimeter 
-      with fully integrated GPS and radio telemetry as standard features, and
-      a "companion interface" that will support optional capabilities in the 
-      future.
-    </para>
-    <para>    
-      Complementing TeleMetrum is TeleDongle, a USB to RF interface for 
-      communicating with TeleMetrum.  Combined with your choice of antenna and 
-      notebook computer, TeleDongle and our associated user interface software
-      form a complete ground station capable of logging and displaying in-flight
-      telemetry, aiding rocket recovery, then processing and archiving flight
-      data for analysis and review.
-    </para>
-  </chapter>
-  <chapter>
-    <title>Getting Started</title>
-    <para>
-      This chapter began as "The Mere-Mortals Quick Start/Usage Guide to 
-      the Altus Metrum Starter Kit" by Bob Finch, W9YA, NAR 12965, TRA 12350, 
-      w9ya@amsat.org.  Bob was one of our first customers for a production
-      TeleMetrum, and the enthusiasm that led to his contribution of this
-      section is immensely gratifying and highy appreciated!
-    </para>
-    <para>
-      The first thing to do after you check the inventory of parts in your 
-      "starter kit" is to charge the battery by plugging it into the 
-      corresponding socket of the TeleMetrum and then using the USB A to B 
-      cable to plug the Telemetrum into your computer's USB socket. The 
-      TeleMetrum circuitry will charge the battery whenever it is plugged 
-      into the usb socket. The TeleMetrum's on-off switch does NOT control 
-      the charging circuitry.  When the GPS chip is initially searching for
-      satellites, the unit will pull more current than it can pull from the
-      usb port, so the battery must be plugged in order to get a good 
-      satellite lock.  Once GPS is locked the current consumption goes back 
-      down enough to enable charging while 
-      running. So it's a good idea to fully charge the battery as your 
-      first item of business so there is no issue getting and maintaining 
-      satellite lock.  The yellow charge indicator led will go out when the 
-      battery is nearly full and the charger goes to trickle charge.
-    </para>
-    <para>
-      The other active device in the starter kit is the half-duplex TeleDongle 
-      rf link.  If you plug it in to your computer it should "just work",
-      showing up as a serial port device.  If you are using Linux and are
-      having problems, try moving to a fresher kernel (2.6.33 or newer), as
-      there were some ugly USB serial driver bugs in earlier versions.
-    </para>
-    <para>
-      Next you should obtain and install the AltOS utilities.  The first
-      generation sofware was written for Linux only.  New software is coming
-      soon that will also run on Windows and Mac.  For now, we'll concentrate
-      on Linux.  If you are using Debian, an 'altos' package already exists, 
-      see http://altusmetrum.org/AltOS for details on how to install it.
-      User-contributed directions for building packages on ArchLinux may be 
-      found in the contrib/arch-linux directory as PKGBUILD files.
-      Between the debian/rules file and the PKGBUILD files in 
-      contrib, you should find enough information to learn how to build the 
-      software for any other version of Linux.
-    </para>
-    <para>
-      When you have successfully installed the software suite (either from 
-      compiled source code or as the pre-built Debian package) you will 
-      have 10 executable programs all of which have names beginning with 'ao-'.
-      ('ao-view' is the lone GUI-based program. 
-      The rest are command-line based.) You will also 
-      have 10 man pages, that give you basic info on each program.
-      And you will also get this documentation in two file types,
-      telemetrum.pdf and telemetrum.html.
-      Finally you will have a couple of control files that allow the ao-view 
-      GUI-based program to appear in your menu of programs (under 
-      the 'Internet' category). 
-    </para>
-    <para>
-      Both Telemetrum and TeleDongle can be directly communicated 
-      with using USB ports. The first thing you should try after getting 
-      both units plugged into to your computer's usb port(s) is to run 
-      'ao-list' from a terminal-window (I use konsole for this,) to see what 
-      port-device-name each device has been assigned by the operating system. 
-      You will need this information to access the devices via their 
-      respective on-board firmware and data using other command line
-      programs in the AltOS software suite.
-    </para>
-    <para>
-      To access the device's firmware for configuration you need a terminal
-      program such as you would use to talk to a modem.  The software 
-      authors prefer using the program 'cu' which comes from the UUCP package
-      on most Unix-like systems such as Linux.  An example command line for
-      cu might be 'cu -l /dev/ttyACM0', substituting the correct number 
-      indicated from running the
-      ao-list program.  Another reasonable terminal program for Linux is
-      'cutecom'.  The default 'escape' 
-      character used by CU (i.e. the character you use to
-      issue commands to cu itself instead of sending the command as input 
-      to the connected device) is a '~'. You will need this for use in 
-      only two different ways during normal operations. First is to exit 
-      the program by sending a '~.' which is called a 'escape-disconnect' 
-      and allows you to close-out from 'cu'. The
-      second use will be outlined later.
-    </para>
-    <para>
-      Both TeleMetrum and TeleDongle share the concept of a two level 
-      command set in their 
-      firmware.  The first layer has several single letter commands. Once 
-      you are using 'cu' (or 'cutecom') sending (typing) a '?' 
-      returns a full list of these
-      commands. The second level are configuration sub-commands accessed 
-      using the 'c' command, for 
-      instance typing 'c?' will give you this second level of commands 
-      (all of which require the
-      letter 'c' to access).  Please note that most configuration options
-      are stored only in DataFlash memory, and only TeleMetrum has this
-      memory to save the various values entered like the channel number 
-      and your callsign when powered off.  TeleDongle requires that you
-      set these each time you plug it in, which ao-view can help with.
-    </para>
-    <para>
-      Try setting these config ('c' or second level menu) values.  A good
-      place to start is by setting your call sign.  By default, the boards
-      use 'N0CALL' which is cute, but not exactly legal!
-      Spend a few minutes getting comfortable with the units, their 
-      firmware, 'cu' (and possibly 'cutecom') For instance, try to send 
-      (type) a 'cr2' and verify the channel change by sending a 'cs'. 
-      Verify you can connect and disconnect from the units while in 'cu' 
-      by sending the escape-disconnect mentioned above.
-    </para>
-    <para>
-      Note that the 'reboot' command, which is very useful on TeleMetrum, 
-      will likely just cause problems with the dongle.  The *correct* way
-      to reset the dongle is just to unplug and re-plug it.
-    </para>
-    <para>
-      A fun thing to do at the launch site and something you can do while 
-      learning how to use these units is to play with the rf-link access 
-      of the TeleMetrum from the TeleDongle.  Be aware that you *must* create
-      some physical separation between the devices, otherwise the link will 
-      not function due to signal overload in the receivers in each device.
-    </para>
-    <para>
-      Now might be a good time to take a break and read the rest of this
-      manual, particularly about the two "modes" that the TeleMetrum 
-      can be placed in and how the position of the TeleMetrum when booting 
-      up will determine whether the unit is in "pad" or "idle" mode.
-    </para>
-    <para>
-      You can access a TeleMetrum in idle mode from the Teledongle's USB 
-      connection using the rf link
-      by issuing a 'p' command to the TeleDongle. Practice connecting and
-      disconnecting ('~~' while using 'cu') from the TeleMetrum.  If 
-      you cannot escape out of the "p" command, (by using a '~~' when in 
-      CU) then it is likely that your kernel has issues.  Try a newer version.
-    </para>
-    <para>
-      Using this rf link allows you to configure the TeleMetrum, test 
-      fire e-matches and igniters from the flight line, check pyro-match 
-      continuity and so forth. You can leave the unit turned on while it 
-      is in 'idle mode' and then place the
-      rocket vertically on the launch pad, walk away and then issue a 
-      reboot command.  The TeleMetrum will reboot and start sending data 
-      having changed to the "pad" mode. If the TeleDongle is not receiving 
-      this data, you can disconnect 'cu' from the Teledongle using the 
-      procedures mentioned above and THEN connect to the TeleDongle from 
-      inside 'ao-view'. If this doesn't work, disconnect from the
-      TeleDongle, unplug it, and try again after plugging it back in.
-    </para>
-    <para>
-      Eventually the GPS will find enough satellites, lock in on them, 
-      and 'ao-view' will both auditorially announce and visually indicate 
-      that GPS is ready.
-      Now you can launch knowing that you have a good data path and 
-      good satellite lock for flight data and recovery.  Remember 
-      you MUST tell ao-view to connect to the TeleDongle explicitly in 
-      order for ao-view to be able to receive data.
-    </para>
-    <para>
-      Both RDF (radio direction finding) tones from the TeleMetrum and 
-      GPS trekking data are available and together are very useful in 
-      locating the rocket once it has landed. (The last good GPS data 
-      received before touch-down will be on the data screen of 'ao-view'.)
-    </para>
-    <para>
-      Once you have recovered the rocket you can download the eeprom 
-      contents using either 'ao-dumplog' (or possibly 'ao-eeprom'), over
-      either a USB cable or over the radio link using TeleDongle.
-      And by following the man page for 'ao-postflight' you can create 
-      various data output reports, graphs, and even kml data to see the 
-      flight trajectory in google-earth. (Moving the viewing angle making 
-      sure to connect the yellow lines while in google-earth is the proper
-      technique.)
-    </para>
-    <para>
-      As for ao-view.... some things are in the menu but don't do anything 
-      very useful.  The developers have stopped working on ao-view to focus
-      on a new, cross-platform ground station program.  Mostly you just use 
-      the Log and Device menus.  It has a wonderful display of the incoming 
-      flight data and I am sure you will enjoy what it has to say to you 
-      once you enable the voice output!
-    </para>
-    <section>
-      <title>FAQ</title>
-      <para>
-        The altimeter (TeleMetrum) seems to shut off when disconnected from the
-        computer.  Make sure the battery is adequately charged.  Remember the
-        unit will pull more power than the USB port can deliver before the 
-        GPS enters "locked" mode.  The battery charges best when TeleMetrum
-        is turned off.
-      </para>
-      <para>
-        It's impossible to stop the TeleDongle when it's in "p" mode, I have
-        to unplug the USB cable?  Make sure you have tried to "escape out" of 
-        this mode.  If this doesn't work the reboot procedure for the 
-        TeleDongle *is* to simply unplug it. 'cu' however will retain it's 
-        outgoing buffer IF your "escape out" ('~~') does not work. 
-        At this point using either 'ao-view' (or possibly
-        'cutemon') instead of 'cu' will 'clear' the issue and allow renewed
-        communication.
-      </para>
-      <para>
-        The amber LED (on the TeleMetrum/altimeter) lights up when both 
-        battery and USB are connected. Does this mean it's charging? 
-        Yes, the yellow LED indicates the charging at the 'regular' rate. 
-        If the led is out but the unit is still plugged into a USB port, 
-        then the battery is being charged at a 'trickle' rate.
-      </para>
-      <para>
-        There are no "dit-dah-dah-dit" sound like the manual mentions?
-        That's the "pad" mode.  Weak batteries might be the problem.
-        It is also possible that the unit is horizontal and the output 
-        is instead a "dit-dit" meaning 'idle'.
-      </para>
-      <para>
-        It's unclear how to use 'ao-view' and other programs when 'cu' 
-        is running. You cannot have more than one program connected to 
-        the TeleDongle at one time without apparent data loss as the 
-        incoming data will not make it to both programs intact. 
-        Disconnect whatever programs aren't currently being used.
-      </para>
-      <para>
-        How do I save flight data?   
-        Live telemetry is written to file(s) whenever 'ao-view' is connected 
-        to the TeleDongle.  The file area defaults to ~/altos
-        but is easily changed using the menus in 'ao-view'. The files that 
-       are written end in '.telem'. The after-flight
-        data-dumped files will end in .eeprom and represent continuous data 
-        unlike the rf-linked .telem files that are subject to the 
-        turnarounds/data-packaging time slots in the half-duplex rf data path. 
-        See the above instructions on what and how to save the eeprom stored 
-        data after physically retrieving your TeleMetrum.
-        </para>
-      </section>
-    </chapter>
-    <chapter>
-      <title>Specifications</title>
-      <itemizedlist>
-        <listitem>
-          <para>
-            Recording altimeter for model rocketry.
-          </para>
-        </listitem>
-        <listitem>
-          <para>
-            Supports dual deployment (can fire 2 ejection charges).
-          </para>
-        </listitem>
-        <listitem>
-          <para>
-            70cm ham-band transceiver for telemetry downlink.
-          </para>
-        </listitem>
-        <listitem>
-          <para>
-            Barometric pressure sensor good to 45k feet MSL.
-          </para>
-        </listitem>
-        <listitem>
-          <para>
-            1-axis high-g accelerometer for motor characterization, capable of 
-            +/- 50g using default part.
-          </para>
-        </listitem>
-        <listitem>
-          <para>
-            On-board, integrated GPS receiver with 5hz update rate capability.
-          </para>
-        </listitem>
-        <listitem>
-          <para>
-            On-board 1 megabyte non-volatile memory for flight data storage.
-          </para>
-        </listitem>
-        <listitem>
-          <para>
-            USB interface for battery charging, configuration, and data recovery.
-          </para>
-        </listitem>
-        <listitem>
-          <para>
-            Fully integrated support for LiPo rechargeable batteries.
-          </para>
-        </listitem>
-        <listitem>
-          <para>
-            Uses LiPo to fire e-matches, support for optional separate pyro 
-            battery if needed.
-          </para>
-        </listitem>
-        <listitem>
-          <para>
-            2.75 x 1 inch board designed to fit inside 29mm airframe coupler tube.
-          </para>
-        </listitem>
-      </itemizedlist>
-    </chapter>
-    <chapter>
-      <title>Handling Precautions</title>
-      <para>
-        TeleMetrum is a sophisticated electronic device.  When handled gently and
-        properly installed in an airframe, it will deliver impressive results.
-        However, like all electronic devices, there are some precautions you
-        must take.
-      </para>
-      <para>
-        The Lithium Polymer rechargeable batteries used with TeleMetrum have an 
-        extraordinary power density.  This is great because we can fly with
-        much less battery mass than if we used alkaline batteries or previous
-        generation rechargeable batteries... but if they are punctured 
-        or their leads are allowed to short, they can and will release their 
-        energy very rapidly!
-        Thus we recommend that you take some care when handling our batteries 
-        and consider giving them some extra protection in your airframe.  We 
-        often wrap them in suitable scraps of closed-cell packing foam before 
-        strapping them down, for example.
-      </para>
-      <para>
-        The TeleMetrum barometric sensor is sensitive to sunlight.  In normal 
-        mounting situations, it and all of the other surface mount components 
-        are "down" towards whatever the underlying mounting surface is, so
-        this is not normally a problem.  Please consider this, though, when
-        designing an installation, for example, in a 29mm airframe's see-through
-        plastic payload bay.
-      </para>
-      <para>
-        The TeleMetrum barometric sensor sampling port must be able to "breathe",
-        both by not being covered by foam or tape or other materials that might
-        directly block the hole on the top of the sensor, but also by having a
-        suitable static vent to outside air.  
-      </para>
-      <para>
-        As with all other rocketry electronics, TeleMetrum must be protected 
-        from exposure to corrosive motor exhaust and ejection charge gasses.
-      </para>
-    </chapter>
-    <chapter>
-      <title>Hardware Overview</title>
-      <para>
-        TeleMetrum is a 1 inch by 2.75 inch circuit board.  It was designed to
-        fit inside coupler for 29mm airframe tubing, but using it in a tube that
-        small in diameter may require some creativity in mounting and wiring 
-        to succeed!  The default 1/4
-        wave UHF wire antenna attached to the center of the nose-cone end of
-        the board is about 7 inches long, and wiring for a power switch and
-        the e-matches for apogee and main ejection charges depart from the 
-        fin can end of the board.  Given all this, an ideal "simple" avionics 
-        bay for TeleMetrum should have at least 10 inches of interior length.
-      </para>
-      <para>
-        A typical TeleMetrum installation using the on-board GPS antenna and
-        default wire UHF antenna involves attaching only a suitable
-        Lithium Polymer battery, a single pole switch for power on/off, and 
-        two pairs of wires connecting e-matches for the apogee and main ejection
-        charges.  
-      </para>
-      <para>
-        By default, we use the unregulated output of the LiPo battery directly
-        to fire ejection charges.  This works marvelously with standard 
-        low-current e-matches like the J-Tek from MJG Technologies, and with 
-        Quest Q2G2 igniters.  However, if you
-        want or need to use a separate pyro battery, you can do so by adding
-        a second 2mm connector to position B2 on the board and cutting the
-        thick pcb trace connecting the LiPo battery to the pyro circuit between
-        the two silk screen marks on the surface mount side of the board shown
-        here [insert photo]
-      </para>
-      <para>
-        We offer two choices of pyro and power switch connector, or you can 
-        choose neither and solder wires directly to the board.  All three choices
-        are reasonable depending on the constraints of your airframe.  Our
-        favorite option when there is sufficient room above the board is to use
-        the Tyco pin header with polarization and locking.  If you choose this
-        option, you crimp individual wires for the power switch and e-matches
-        into a mating connector, and installing and removing the TeleMetrum
-        board from an airframe is as easy as plugging or unplugging two 
-        connectors.  If the airframe will not support this much height or if
-        you want to be able to directly attach e-match leads to the board, we
-        offer a screw terminal block.  This is very similar to what most other
-        altimeter vendors provide and so may be the most familiar
-        option.  You'll need a very small straight blade screwdriver to connect
-        and disconnect the board in this case, such as you might find in a
-        jeweler's screwdriver set.  Finally, you can forego both options and
-        solder wires directly to the board, which may be the best choice for
-        minimum diameter and/or minimum mass designs. 
-      </para>
-      <para>
-        For most airframes, the integrated GPS antenna and wire UHF antenna are
-        a great combination.  However, if you are installing in a carbon-fiber
-        electronics bay which is opaque to RF signals, you may need to use 
-        off-board external antennas instead.  In this case, you can order
-        TeleMetrum with an SMA connector for the UHF antenna connection, and
-        you can unplug the integrated GPS antenna and select an appropriate 
-        off-board GPS antenna with cable terminating in a U.FL connector.
-      </para>
-    </chapter>
-    <chapter>
-      <title>Operation</title>
-      <section>
-        <title>Firmware Modes </title>
-        <para>
-          The AltOS firmware build for TeleMetrum has two fundamental modes,
-          "idle" and "flight".  Which of these modes the firmware operates in
-          is determined by the orientation of the rocket (well, actually the
-          board, of course...) at the time power is switched on.  If the rocket
-          is "nose up", then TeleMetrum assumes it's on a rail or rod being
-          prepared for launch, so the firmware chooses flight mode.  However,
-          if the rocket is more or less horizontal, the firmware instead enters
-          idle mode.
-        </para>
-        <para>
-          At power on, you will hear three beeps ("S" in Morse code for startup)
-          and then a pause while 
-          TeleMetrum completes initialization and self tests, and decides which
-          mode to enter next.
-        </para>
-        <para>
-          In flight mode, TeleMetrum turns on the GPS system, engages the flight
-          state machine, goes into transmit-only mode on the RF link sending 
-          telemetry, and waits for launch to be detected.  Flight mode is
-          indicated by an audible "di-dah-dah-dit" ("P" for pad) on the 
-          beeper, followed by
-          beeps indicating the state of the pyrotechnic igniter continuity.
-          One beep indicates apogee continuity, two beeps indicate
-          main continuity, three beeps indicate both apogee and main continuity,
-          and one longer "brap" sound indicates no continuity.  For a dual
-          deploy flight, make sure you're getting three beeps before launching!
-          For apogee-only or motor eject flights, do what makes sense.
-        </para>
-        <para>
-          In idle mode, you will hear an audible "di-dit" ("I" for idle), and
-          the normal flight state machine is disengaged, thus
-          no ejection charges will fire.  TeleMetrum also listens on the RF
-          link when in idle mode for packet mode requests sent from TeleDongle.
-          Commands can be issued to a TeleMetrum in idle mode over either
-          USB or the RF link equivalently.
-          Idle mode is useful for configuring TeleMetrum, for extracting data 
-          from the on-board storage chip after flight, and for ground testing
-          pyro charges.
-        </para>
-        <para>
-          One "neat trick" of particular value when TeleMetrum is used with very
-          large airframes, is that you can power the board up while the rocket
-          is horizontal, such that it comes up in idle mode.  Then you can 
-          raise the airframe to launch position, use a TeleDongle to open
-          a packet connection, and issue a 'reset' command which will cause
-          TeleMetrum to reboot, realize it's now nose-up, and thus choose
-          flight mode.  This is much safer than standing on the top step of a
-          rickety step-ladder or hanging off the side of a launch tower with
-          a screw-driver trying to turn on your avionics before installing
-          igniters!
-        </para>
-      </section>
-      <section>
-        <title>GPS </title>
-        <para>
-          TeleMetrum includes a complete GPS receiver.  See a later section for
-          a brief explanation of how GPS works that will help you understand
-          the information in the telemetry stream.  The bottom line is that
-          the TeleMetrum GPS receiver needs to lock onto at least four 
-          satellites to obtain a solid 3 dimensional position fix and know 
-          what time it is!
-        </para>
-        <para>
-          TeleMetrum provides backup power to the GPS chip any time a LiPo
-          battery is connected.  This allows the receiver to "warm start" on
-          the launch rail much faster than if every power-on were a "cold start"
-          for the GPS receiver.  In typical operations, powering up TeleMetrum
-          on the flight line in idle mode while performing final airframe
-          preparation will be sufficient to allow the GPS receiver to cold
-          start and acquire lock.  Then the board can be powered down during
-          RSO review and installation on a launch rod or rail.  When the board
-          is turned back on, the GPS system should lock very quickly, typically
-          long before igniter installation and return to the flight line are
-          complete.
-        </para>
-      </section>
-      <section>
-        <title>Ground Testing </title>
-        <para>
-          An important aspect of preparing a rocket using electronic deployment
-          for flight is ground testing the recovery system.  Thanks
-          to the bi-directional RF link central to the Altus Metrum system, 
-          this can be accomplished in a TeleMetrum-equipped rocket without as
-          much work as you may be accustomed to with other systems.  It can
-          even be fun!
-        </para>
-        <para>
-          Just prep the rocket for flight, then power up TeleMetrum while the
-          airframe is horizontal.  This will cause the firmware to go into 
-          "idle" mode, in which the normal flight state machine is disabled and
-          charges will not fire without manual command.  Then, establish an
-          RF packet connection from a TeleDongle-equipped computer using the 
-          P command from a safe distance.  You can now command TeleMetrum to
-          fire the apogee or main charges to complete your testing.
-        </para>
-        <para>
-          In order to reduce the chance of accidental firing of pyrotechnic
-          charges, the command to fire a charge is intentionally somewhat
-          difficult to type, and the built-in help is slightly cryptic to 
-          prevent accidental echoing of characters from the help text back at
-          the board from firing a charge.  The command to fire the apogee
-          drogue charge is 'i DoIt drogue' and the command to fire the main
-          charge is 'i DoIt main'.
-        </para>
-      </section>
-      <section>
-        <title>Radio Link </title>
-        <para>
-          The chip our boards are based on incorporates an RF transceiver, but
-          it's not a full duplex system... each end can only be transmitting or
-          receiving at any given moment.  So we had to decide how to manage the
-          link.
-        </para>
-        <para>
-          By design, TeleMetrum firmware listens for an RF connection when
-          it's in "idle mode" (turned on while the rocket is horizontal), which
-          allows us to use the RF link to configure the rocket, do things like
-          ejection tests, and extract data after a flight without having to 
-          crack open the airframe.  However, when the board is in "flight 
-          mode" (turned on when the rocket is vertical) the TeleMetrum only 
-          transmits and doesn't listen at all.  That's because we want to put 
-          ultimate priority on event detection and getting telemetry out of 
-          the rocket and out over
-          the RF link in case the rocket crashes and we aren't able to extract
-          data later... 
-        </para>
-        <para>
-          We don't use a 'normal packet radio' mode because they're just too
-          inefficient.  The GFSK modulation we use is just FSK with the 
-          baseband pulses passed through a
-          Gaussian filter before they go into the modulator to limit the
-          transmitted bandwidth.  When combined with the hardware forward error
-          correction support in the cc1111 chip, this allows us to have a very
-          robust 38.4 kilobit data link with only 10 milliwatts of transmit power,
-          a whip antenna in the rocket, and a hand-held Yagi on the ground.  We've
-          had a test flight above 12k AGL with good reception, and calculations
-          suggest we should be good to 40k AGL or more with a 5-element yagi on
-          the ground.  We hope to fly boards to higher altitudes soon, and would
-          of course appreciate customer feedback on performance in higher
-          altitude flights!
-        </para>
-      </section>
-      <section>
-        <title>Configurable Parameters</title>
-        <para>
-          Configuring a TeleMetrum board for flight is very simple.  Because we
-          have both acceleration and pressure sensors, there is no need to set
-          a "mach delay", for example.  The few configurable parameters can all
-          be set using a simple terminal program over the USB port or RF link
-          via TeleDongle.
-        </para>
-        <section>
-          <title>Radio Channel</title>
-          <para>
-            Our firmware supports 10 channels.  The default channel 0 corresponds
-            to a center frequency of 434.550 Mhz, and channels are spaced every 
-            100 khz.  Thus, channel 1 is 434.650 Mhz, and channel 9 is 435.550 Mhz.
-            At any given launch, we highly recommend coordinating who will use
-            each channel and when to avoid interference.  And of course, both 
-            TeleMetrum and TeleDongle must be configured to the same channel to
-            successfully communicate with each other.
-          </para>
-          <para>
-            To set the radio channel, use the 'c r' command, like 'c r 3' to set
-            channel 3.  
-            As with all 'c' sub-commands, follow this with a 'c w' to write the 
-            change to the parameter block in the on-board DataFlash chip.
-          </para>
-        </section>
-        <section>
-          <title>Apogee Delay</title>
-          <para>
-            Apogee delay is the number of seconds after TeleMetrum detects flight
-            apogee that the drogue charge should be fired.  In most cases, this
-            should be left at the default of 0.  However, if you are flying
-            redundant electronics such as for an L3 certification, you may wish 
-            to set one of your altimeters to a positive delay so that both 
-            primary and backup pyrotechnic charges do not fire simultaneously.
-          </para>
-          <para>
-            To set the apogee delay, use the [FIXME] command.
-            As with all 'c' sub-commands, follow this with a 'c w' to write the 
-            change to the parameter block in the on-board DataFlash chip.
-          </para>
-        </section>
-        <section>
-          <title>Main Deployment Altitude</title>
-          <para>
-            By default, TeleMetrum will fire the main deployment charge at an
-            elevation of 250 meters (about 820 feet) above ground.  We think this
-            is a good elevation for most airframes, but feel free to change this 
-            to suit.  In particular, if you are flying two altimeters, you may
-            wish to set the
-            deployment elevation for the backup altimeter to be something lower
-            than the primary so that both pyrotechnic charges don't fire
-            simultaneously.
-          </para>
-          <para>
-            To set the main deployment altitude, use the [FIXME] command.
-            As with all 'c' sub-commands, follow this with a 'c w' to write the 
-            change to the parameter block in the on-board DataFlash chip.
-          </para>
-        </section>
-      </section>
-      <section>
-        <title>Calibration</title>
-        <para>
-          There are only two calibrations required for a TeleMetrum board, and
-          only one for TeleDongle.
-        </para>
-        <section>
-          <title>Radio Frequency</title>
-          <para>
-            The radio frequency is synthesized from a clock based on the 48 Mhz
-            crystal on the board.  The actual frequency of this oscillator must be
-            measured to generate a calibration constant.  While our GFSK modulation
-            bandwidth is wide enough to allow boards to communicate even when 
-            their oscillators are not on exactly the same frequency, performance
-            is best when they are closely matched.
-            Radio frequency calibration requires a calibrated frequency counter.
-            Fortunately, once set, the variation in frequency due to aging and
-            temperature changes is small enough that re-calibration by customers
-            should generally not be required.
-          </para>
-          <para>
-            To calibrate the radio frequency, connect the UHF antenna port to a
-            frequency counter, set the board to channel 0, and use the 'C' 
-            command to generate a CW carrier.  Wait for the transmitter temperature
-            to stabilize and the frequency to settle down.  
-            Then, divide 434.550 Mhz by the 
-            measured frequency and multiply by the current radio cal value show
-            in the 'c s' command.  For an unprogrammed board, the default value
-            is 1186611.  Take the resulting integer and program it using the 'c f'
-            command.  Testing with the 'C' command again should show a carrier
-            within a few tens of Hertz of the intended frequency.
-            As with all 'c' sub-commands, follow this with a 'c w' to write the 
-            change to the parameter block in the on-board DataFlash chip.
-          </para>
-        </section>
-        <section>
-          <title>Accelerometer</title>
-          <para>
-            The accelerometer we use has its own 5 volt power supply and
-            the output must be passed through a resistive voltage divider to match
-            the input of our 3.3 volt ADC.  This means that unlike the barometric
-            sensor, the output of the acceleration sensor is not ratiometric to 
-            the ADC converter, and calibration is required.  We also support the 
-            use of any of several accelerometers from a Freescale family that 
-            includes at least +/- 40g, 50g, 100g, and 200g parts.  Using gravity,
-            a simple 2-point calibration yields acceptable results capturing both
-            the different sensitivities and ranges of the different accelerometer
-            parts and any variation in power supply voltages or resistor values
-            in the divider network.
-          </para>
-          <para>
-            To calibrate the acceleration sensor, use the 'c a 0' command.  You
-            will be prompted to orient the board vertically with the UHF antenna
-            up and press a key, then to orient the board vertically with the 
-            UHF antenna down and press a key.
-            As with all 'c' sub-commands, follow this with a 'c w' to write the 
-            change to the parameter block in the on-board DataFlash chip.
-          </para>
-          <para>
-            The +1g and -1g calibration points are included in each telemetry
-            frame and are part of the header extracted by ao-dumplog after flight.
-            Note that we always store and return raw ADC samples for each
-            sensor... nothing is permanently "lost" or "damaged" if the 
-            calibration is poor.
-          </para>
-        </section>
-      </section>
-    </chapter>
-    <chapter>
-      <title>Using Altus Metrum Products</title>
-      <section>
-        <title>Being Legal</title>
-        <para>
-          First off, in the US, you need an [amateur radio license](../Radio) or 
-          other authorization to legally operate the radio transmitters that are part
-          of our products.
-        </para>
-        <section>
-          <title>In the Rocket</title>
-          <para>
-            In the rocket itself, you just need a [TeleMetrum](../TeleMetrum) board and 
-            a LiPo rechargeable battery.  An 860mAh battery weighs less than a 9V 
-            alkaline battery, and will run a [TeleMetrum](../TeleMetrum) for hours.
-          </para>
-          <para>
-            By default, we ship TeleMetrum with a simple wire antenna.  If your 
-            electronics bay or the airframe it resides within is made of carbon fiber, 
-            which is opaque to RF signals, you may choose to have an SMA connector 
-            installed so that you can run a coaxial cable to an antenna mounted 
-            elsewhere in the rocket.
-          </para>
-        </section>
-        <section>
-          <title>On the Ground</title>
-          <para>
-            To receive the data stream from the rocket, you need an antenna and short 
-            feedline connected to one of our [TeleDongle](../TeleDongle) units.  The
-            TeleDongle in turn plugs directly into the USB port on a notebook 
-            computer.  Because TeleDongle looks like a simple serial port, your computer
-            does not require special device drivers... just plug it in.
-          </para>
-          <para>
-            Right now, all of our application software is written for Linux.  However, 
-            because we understand that many people run Windows or MacOS, we are working 
-            on a new ground station program written in Java that should work on all
-            operating systems.
-          </para>
-          <para>
-            After the flight, you can use the RF link to extract the more detailed data 
-            logged in the rocket, or you can use a mini USB cable to plug into the 
-            TeleMetrum board directly.  Pulling out the data without having to open up
-            the rocket is pretty cool!  A USB cable is also how you charge the LiPo 
-            battery, so you'll want one of those anyway... the same cable used by lots 
-            of digital cameras and other modern electronic stuff will work fine.
-          </para>
-          <para>
-            If your rocket lands out of sight, you may enjoy having a hand-held GPS 
-            receiver, so that you can put in a waypoint for the last reported rocket 
-            position before touch-down.  This makes looking for your rocket a lot like 
-            Geo-Cacheing... just go to the waypoint and look around starting from there.
-          </para>
-          <para>
-            You may also enjoy having a ham radio "HT" that covers the 70cm band... you 
-            can use that with your antenna to direction-find the rocket on the ground 
-            the same way you can use a Walston or Beeline tracker.  This can be handy 
-            if the rocket is hiding in sage brush or a tree, or if the last GPS position 
-            doesn't get you close enough because the rocket dropped into a canyon, or 
-            the wind is blowing it across a dry lake bed, or something like that...  Keith
-            and Bdale both currently own and use the Yaesu VX-7R at launches.
-          </para>
-          <para>
-            So, to recap, on the ground the hardware you'll need includes:
-            <orderedlist inheritnum='inherit' numeration='arabic'>
-              <listitem> 
-                an antenna and feedline
-              </listitem>
-              <listitem> 
-                a TeleDongle
-              </listitem>
-              <listitem> 
-                a notebook computer
-              </listitem>
-              <listitem> 
-                optionally, a handheld GPS receiver
-              </listitem>
-              <listitem> 
-                optionally, an HT or receiver covering 435 Mhz
-              </listitem>
-            </orderedlist>
-          </para>
-          <para>
-            The best hand-held commercial directional antennas we've found for radio 
-            direction finding rockets are from 
-            <ulink url="http://www.arrowantennas.com/" >
-              Arrow Antennas.
-            </ulink>
-            The 440-3 and 440-5 are both good choices for finding a 
-            TeleMetrum-equipped rocket when used with a suitable 70cm HT.  
-          </para>
-        </section>
-        <section>
-          <title>Data Analysis</title>
-          <para>
-            Our software makes it easy to log the data from each flight, both the 
-            telemetry received over the RF link during the flight itself, and the more
-            complete data log recorded in the DataFlash memory on the TeleMetrum 
-            board.  Once this data is on your computer, our postflight tools make it
-            easy to quickly get to the numbers everyone wants, like apogee altitude, 
-            max acceleration, and max velocity.  You can also generate and view a 
-            standard set of plots showing the altitude, acceleration, and
-            velocity of the rocket during flight.  And you can even export a data file 
-            useable with Google Maps and Google Earth for visualizing the flight path 
-            in two or three dimensions!
-          </para>
-          <para>
-            Our ultimate goal is to emit a set of files for each flight that can be
-            published as a web page per flight, or just viewed on your local disk with 
-            a web browser.
-          </para>
-        </section>
-        <section>
-          <title>Future Plans</title>
-          <para>
-            In the future, we intend to offer "companion boards" for the rocket that will
-            plug in to TeleMetrum to collect additional data, provide more pyro channels,
-            and so forth.  A reference design for a companion board will be documented
-            soon, and will be compatible with open source Arduino programming tools.
-          </para>
-          <para>
-            We are also working on the design of a hand-held ground terminal that will
-            allow monitoring the rocket's status, collecting data during flight, and
-            logging data after flight without the need for a notebook computer on the
-            flight line.  Particularly since it is so difficult to read most notebook
-            screens in direct sunlight, we think this will be a great thing to have.
-          </para>
-          <para>
-            Because all of our work is open, both the hardware designs and the software,
-            if you have some great idea for an addition to the current Altus Metrum family,
-            feel free to dive in and help!  Or let us know what you'd like to see that 
-            we aren't already working on, and maybe we'll get excited about it too... 
-          </para>
-        </section>
-      </section>
-      <section>
-        <title>
-          How GPS Works
-        </title>
-        <para>
-          Placeholder.
-        </para>
-      </section>
-    </chapter>
-  </book>
-