crudely incorporate "day in the life" info from web page
authorBdale Garbee <bdale@gag.com>
Fri, 2 Apr 2010 05:56:47 +0000 (23:56 -0600)
committerBdale Garbee <bdale@gag.com>
Fri, 2 Apr 2010 05:56:47 +0000 (23:56 -0600)
doc/telemetrum.xsl

index 97d8fb2..fb65ce0 100644 (file)
     </para>
   </chapter>
   <chapter>
-    <title>System Overview</title>
-    <para>
-      Placeholder.
-    </para>
-  </chapter>
-  <chapter>
-    <title>System Overview</title>
-    <para>
-      Placeholder.
-    </para>
+    <title>Using Altus Metrum Products</title>
+    <section>
+      <title>Being Legal</title>
+      <para>
+        First off, in the US, you need an [amateur radio license](../Radio) or 
+        other authorization to legally operate the radio transmitters that are part
+        of our products.
+      </para>
+      <section>
+        <title>In the Rocket</title>
+        <para>
+          In the rocket itself, you just need a [TeleMetrum](../TeleMetrum) board and 
+          a LiPo rechargeable battery.  An 860mAh battery weighs less than a 9V 
+          alkaline battery, and will run a [TeleMetrum](../TeleMetrum) for hours.
+        </para>
+        <para>
+          By default, we ship TeleMetrum with a simple wire antenna.  If your 
+          electronics bay or the airframe it resides within is made of carbon fiber, 
+          which is opaque to RF signals, you may choose to have an SMA connector 
+          installed so that you can run a coaxial cable to an antenna mounted 
+          elsewhere in the rocket.
+        </para>
+      </section>
+      <section>
+        <title>On the Ground</title>
+        <para>
+          To receive the data stream from the rocket, you need an antenna and short 
+          feedline connected to one of our [TeleDongle](../TeleDongle) units.  The
+          TeleDongle in turn plugs directly into the USB port on a notebook 
+          computer.  Because TeleDongle looks like a simple serial port, your computer
+          does not require special device drivers... just plug it in.
+        </para>
+        <para>
+          Right now, all of our application software is written for Linux.  However, 
+          because we understand that many people run Windows or MacOS, we are working 
+          on a new ground station program written in Java that should work on all
+          operating systems.
+        </para>
+        <para>
+          After the flight, you can use the RF link to extract the more detailed data 
+          logged in the rocket, or you can use a mini USB cable to plug into the 
+          TeleMetrum board directly.  Pulling out the data without having to open up
+          the rocket is pretty cool!  A USB cable is also how you charge the LiPo 
+          battery, so you'll want one of those anyway... the same cable used by lots 
+          of digital cameras and other modern electronic stuff will work fine.
+        </para>
+        <para>
+          If your rocket lands out of sight, you may enjoy having a hand-held GPS 
+          receiver, so that you can put in a waypoint for the last reported rocket 
+          position before touch-down.  This makes looking for your rocket a lot like 
+          Geo-Cacheing... just go to the waypoint and look around starting from there.
+        </para>
+        <para>
+          You may also enjoy having a ham radio "HT" that covers the 70cm band... you 
+          can use that with your antenna to direction-find the rocket on the ground 
+          the same way you can use a Walston or Beeline tracker.  This can be handy 
+          if the rocket is hiding in sage brush or a tree, or if the last GPS position 
+          doesn't get you close enough because the rocket dropped into a canyon, or 
+          the wind is blowing it across a dry lake bed, or something like that...  Keith
+          and Bdale both currently own and use the 
+          [Yaesu VX-6R](http://yaesu.com/indexVS.cfm?cmd=DisplayProducts&ProdCatID=111&encProdID=4C6F204F6FEBB5BAFA58BCC1C131EAC0&DivisionID=65&isArchived=0) 
+          at launches.
+        </para>
+        <para>
+          So, to recap, on the ground the hardware you'll need includes:
+          <orderedlist inheritnum='inherit' numeration='arabic'>
+            <listitem> 
+              an antenna and feedline
+            </listitem>
+            <listitem> 
+              a TeleDongle
+            </listitem>
+            <listitem> 
+              a notebook computer
+            </listitem>
+            <listitem> 
+              optionally, a handheld GPS receiver
+            </listitem>
+            <listitem> 
+              optionally, an HT or receiver covering 435 Mhz
+            </listitem>
+          </orderedlist>
+        </para>
+        <para>
+          The best hand-held commercial directional antennas we've found for radio 
+          direction finding rockets are from 
+          [Arrow Antennas](http://www.arrowantennas.com/).  The 440-3 and 440-5 are 
+          both good choices for finding a TeleMetrum-equipped rocket when used with 
+          a suitable 70cm HT.  
+        </para>
+      </section>
+      <section>
+        <title>Data Analysis</title>
+        <para>
+          Our software makes it easy to log the data from each flight, both the 
+          telemetry received over the RF link during the flight itself, and the more
+          complete data log recorded in the DataFlash memory on the TeleMetrum 
+          board.  Once this data is on your computer, our postflight tools make it
+          easy to quickly get to the numbers everyone wants, like apogee altitude, 
+          max acceleration, and max velocity.  You can also generate and view a 
+          standard set of plots showing the altitude, acceleration, and
+          velocity of the rocket during flight.  And you can even export a data file 
+          useable with Google Maps and Google Earth for visualizing the flight path 
+          in two or three dimensions!
+        </para>
+        <para>
+          Our ultimate goal is to emit a set of files for each flight that can be
+          published as a web page per flight, or just viewed on your local disk with 
+          a web browser.
+        </para>
+      </section>
+      <section>
+        <title>Future Plans</title>
+        <para>
+          In the future, we intend to offer "companion boards" for the rocket that will
+          plug in to TeleMetrum to collect additional data, provide more pyro channels,
+          and so forth.  A reference design for a companion board will be documented
+          soon, and will be compatible with open source Arduino programming tools.
+        </para>
+        <para>
+          We are also working on the design of a hand-held ground terminal that will
+          allow monitoring the rocket's status, collecting data during flight, and
+          logging data after flight without the need for a notebook computer on the
+          flight line.  Particularly since it is so difficult to read most notebook
+          screens in direct sunlight, we think this will be a great thing to have.
+        </para>
+        <para>
+          Because all of our work is open, both the hardware designs and the software,
+          if you have some great idea for an addition to the current Altus Metrum family,
+          feel free to dive in and help!  Or let us know what you'd like to see that 
+          we aren't already working on, and maybe we'll get excited about it too... 
+        </para>
+      </section>
+    </section>
   </chapter>
 </book>