doc: Add Installation Recommendations chapter
authorKeith Packard <keithp@keithp.com>
Tue, 23 Aug 2011 00:18:02 +0000 (17:18 -0700)
committerKeith Packard <keithp@keithp.com>
Tue, 23 Aug 2011 00:20:06 +0000 (17:20 -0700)
Document installation suggestions, including mounting, RFI, antenna
issues and ground testing.

Signed-off-by: Keith Packard <keithp@keithp.com>
doc/altusmetrum.xsl

index e97666a..601b62e 100644 (file)
@@ -1810,6 +1810,220 @@ NAR #88757, TRA #12200
         </para>
     </section>
   </chapter>
+  <chapter>
+    <title>Altimeter Installation Recommendations</title>
+    <para>
+      Building high-power rockets that fly safely is hard enough. Mix
+      in some sophisticated electronics and a bunch of radio energy
+      and oftentimes you find few perfect solutions. This chapter
+      contains some suggestions about how to install AltusMetrum
+      products into the rocket airframe, including how to safely and
+      reliably mix a variety of electronics into the same airframe.
+    </para>
+    <section>
+      <title>Mounting the Altimeter</title>
+      <para>
+       The first consideration is to ensure that the altimeter is
+       securely fastened to the airframe. For TeleMetrum, we use
+       nylon standoffs and nylon screws; they're good to at least 50G
+       and cannot cause any electrical issues on the board. For
+       TeleMini, we usually cut small pieces of 1/16" balsa to fit
+       under the screw holes, and then take 2x56 nylon screws and
+       screw them through the TeleMini mounting holes, through the
+       balsa and into the underlying material.
+      </para>
+      <orderedlist inheritnum='inherit' numeration='arabic'>
+       <listitem>
+         Make sure TeleMetrum is aligned precisely along the axis of
+         acceleration so that the accelerometer can accurately
+         capture data during the flight.
+       </listitem>
+       <listitem>
+         Watch for any metal touching components on the
+         board. Shorting out connections on the bottom of the board
+         can cause the altimeter to fail during flight.
+       </listitem>
+      </orderedlist>
+    </section>
+    <section>
+      <title>Dealing with the Antenna</title>
+      <para>
+       The antenna supplied is just a piece of solid, insulated,
+       wire. If it gets damaged or broken, it can be easily
+       replaced. It should be kept straight and not cut; bending or
+       cutting it will change the resonant frequency and/or
+       impedence, making it a less efficient radiator and thus
+       reducing the range of the telemetry signal.
+      </para>
+      <para>
+       Keeping metal away from the antenna will provide better range
+       and a more even radiation pattern. In most rockets, it's not
+       entirely possible to isolate the antenna from metal
+       components; there are often bolts, all-thread and wires from other
+       electronics to contend with. Just be aware that the more stuff
+       like this around the antenna, the lower the range.
+      </para>
+      <para>
+       Make sure the antenna is not inside a tube made or covered
+       with conducting material. Carbon fibre is the most common
+       culprit here -- CF is a good conductor and will effectively
+       shield the antenna, dramatically reducing signal strength and
+       range. Metalic flake paint is another effective shielding
+       material which is to be avoided around any antennas.
+      </para>
+      <para>
+       If the ebay is large enough, it can be convenient to simply
+       mount the altimeter at one end and stretch the antenna out
+       inside. Taping the antenna to the sled can keep it straight
+       under acceleration. If there are metal rods, keep the
+       antenna as far away as possible.
+      </para>
+      <para>
+       For a shorter ebay, it's quite practical to have the antenna
+       run through a bulkhead and into an adjacent bay. Drill a small
+       hole in the bulkhead, pass the antenna wire through it and
+       then seal it up with glue or clay. We've also used acrylic
+       tubing to create a cavity for the antenna wire. This works a
+       bit better in that the antenna is known to stay straight and
+       not get folded by recovery components in the bay. Angle the
+       tubing towards the side wall of the rocket and it ends up
+       consuming very little space.
+      </para>
+      <para>
+       If you need to place the antenna at a distance from the
+       altimeter, you can replace the antenna with an edge-mounted
+       SMA connector, and then run 50Ω coax from the board to the
+       antenna. Building a remote antenna is beyond the scope of this
+       manual.
+      </para>
+    </section>
+    <section>
+      <title>Preserving GPS Reception</title>
+      <para>
+       The GPS antenna and receiver in TeleMetrum are highly
+       sensitive and normally have no trouble tracking enough
+       satellites to provide accurate position information for
+       recovering the rocket. However, there are many ways to
+       attenuate the GPS signal.
+      <orderedlist inheritnum='inherit' numeration='arabic'>
+       <listitem>
+         Conductive tubing or coatings. Carbon fiber and metal
+         tubing, or metalic paint will all dramatically attenuate the
+         GPS signal. We've never heard of anyone successfully
+         receiving GPS from inside these materials.
+       </listitem>
+       <listitem>
+         Metal components near the GPS patch antenna. These will
+         de-tune the patch antenna, changing the resonant frequency
+         away from the L1 carrier and reduce the effectiveness of the
+         antenna. You can place as much stuff as you like beneath the
+         antenna as that's covered with a ground plane. But, keep
+         wires and metal out from above the patch antenna.
+       </listitem>
+      </orderedlist>
+      </para>
+    </section>
+    <section>
+      <title>Radio Frequency Interference</title>
+      <para>
+       Any altimeter will generate RFI; the digital circuits use
+       high-frequency clocks that spray radio interference across a
+       wide band. Altusmetrum altimeters generate intentional radio
+       signals as well, increasing the amount of RF energy around the board.
+      </para>
+      <para>
+       Rocketry altimeters also use precise sensors measuring air
+       pressure and acceleration. Tiny changes in voltage can cause
+       these sensor readings to vary by a huge amount. When the
+       sensors start mis-reporting data, the altimeter can either
+       fire the igniters at the wrong time, or not fire them at all.
+      </para>
+      <para>
+       Voltages are induced when radio frequency energy is
+       transmitted from one circuit to another. Here are things that
+       increase the induced voltage and current:
+      </para>
+      <itemizedlist>
+       <listitem>
+         Keep wires from different circuits apart. Moving circuits
+         further apart will reduce RFI.
+       </listitem>
+       <listitem>
+         Avoid parallel wires from different circuits. The longer two
+         wires run parallel to one another, the larger the amount of
+         transferred energy. Cross wires at right angles to reduce
+         RFI.
+       </listitem>
+       <listitem>
+         Twist wires from the same circuits. Two wires the same
+         distance from the transmitter will get the same amount of
+         induced energy which will then cancel out. Any time you have
+         a wire pair running together, twist the pair together to
+         even out distances and reduce RFI. For altimeters, this
+         includes battery leads, switch hookups and igniter
+         circuits.
+       </listitem>
+       <listitem>
+         Avoid resonant lengths. Know what frequencies are present
+         in the environment and avoid having wire lengths near a
+         natural resonant length. Altusmetrum products transmit on the
+         70cm amateur band, so you should avoid lengths that are a
+         simple ratio of that length; essentially any multiple of 1/4
+         of the wavelength (17.5cm).
+       </listitem>
+      </itemizedlist>
+    </section>
+    <section>
+      <title>The Barometric Sensor</title>
+      <para>
+       Altusmetrum altimeters measure altitude with a barometric
+       sensor, essentially measuring the amount of air above the
+       rocket to figure out how high it is. A large number of
+       measurements are taken as the altimeter initializes itself to
+       figure out the pad altitude. Subsequent measurements are then
+       used to compute the height above the pad.
+      </para>
+      <para>
+       To accurately measure atmospheric pressure, the ebay
+       containing the altimeter must be vented outside the
+       airframe. The vent must be placed in a region of linear
+       airflow, smooth and not in an area of increasing or decreasing
+       pressure.
+      </para>
+      <para>
+       The barometric sensor in the altimeter is quite sensitive to
+       chemical damage from the products of APCP or BP combustion, so
+       make sure the ebay is carefully sealed from any compartment
+       which contains ejection charges or motors.
+      </para>
+    </section>
+    <section>
+      <title>Ground Testing</title>
+      <para>
+       The most important aspect of any installation is careful
+       ground testing. Bringing an airframe up to the LCO table which
+       hasn't been ground tested can lead to delays or ejection
+       charges firing on the pad, or, even worse, a recovery system
+       failure.
+      </para>
+      <para>
+       Do a 'full systems' test that includes wiring up all igniters
+       without any BP and turning on all of the electronics in flight
+       mode. This will catch any mistakes in wiring and any residual
+       RFI issues that might accidentally fire igniters at the wrong
+       time. Let the airframe sit for several minutes, checking for
+       adequate telemetry signal strength and GPS lock.
+      </para>
+      <para>
+       Ground test the ejection charges. Prepare the rocket for
+       flight, loading ejection charges and igniters. Completely
+       assemble the airframe and then use the 'Fire Igniters'
+       interface through a TeleDongle to command each charge to
+       fire. Make sure the charge is sufficient to robustly separate
+       the airframe and deploy the recovery system.
+      </para>
+    </section>
+  </chapter>
   <chapter>
     <title>Hardware Specifications</title>
     <section>