more hacking on the text
authorBdale Garbee <bdale@gag.com>
Mon, 22 Oct 2018 22:54:11 +0000 (16:54 -0600)
committerBdale Garbee <bdale@gag.com>
Mon, 22 Oct 2018 22:54:11 +0000 (16:54 -0600)
rockets/airframes/MehGaNuke/index.mdwn

index 1d80528..1d067a1 100644 (file)
@@ -163,17 +163,42 @@ The first flight of this airframe was at the
 [Kloudbusters](http://kloudbusters.org/)
 [Airfest 24](http://kloudbusters.org/airfest/) in Argonia, Kansas, USA, 
 on Saturday, 1 September 2018.  The motor was a 6-inch "O" built by James 
-Russell using his well-known "Russell Red" formula.  Due to a slightly larger
-than optimal nozzle throat, the motor burn was a bit longer and average thrust
-a bit lower than expected... but a side-effect was a 9-10 foot brilliant red
-flame tail that was awesome to see!  The rocket hit about Mach 0.6 on the way
-to 8068 feet above ground, and was recovered safely.  Weather-cocking due to
-wind caused the airframe to have a residual speed at apogee of nearly 60 meters
-per second, so not surprisingly there was some modest zippering of the top of
-the airframe.  It also seems clear that the ARRD failed to retain the deployment
-bag, as the main chute deployed a few seconds after apogee.  The stress at 
-deployment tore the strap off the deployment bag, and the deployment bag was not
-recovered.  Some minor re-design of the deployment sequence seems indicated
-before future flights.  All in all, though, this was an outstanding group 
-effort, a lovely flight, and a huge crowd-pleaser!
+Russell using his well-known "Russell Red" formula.  The total launch mass 
+was about 205 pounds on the rail.  Due to a slightly larger than optimal
+nozzle throat, the motor burn at 7.7 seconds was a bit longer than expected, 
+pushing the airframe with an average acceleration of only 2.89 G to a 
+maximum speed of Mach 0.6 on the way to 8068 feet above ground.  
+
+Weather-cocking due to wind caused the airframe to have a residual speed at 
+apogee of nearly 60 meters per second, so not surprisingly there was zippering
+of the top of the main airframe tube.  It also seems clear that the ARRD 
+failed to retain the deployment bag, as the main chute deployed a few seconds 
+after apogee.  We had some difficulty with the ARRD during assembly on the
+rail, so this wasn't terribly surprising.  Recovery was completely safe with
+the nose descending under 2 5-foot mil-surplus chutes, and the bulk of the
+airframe descending under a 28-foot mil-surplus chute.
+
+[Tender Descender](http://www.tinderrocketry.com/l13-tender-descender-tether).
+
+The stress at deployment tore the strap off the deployment bag, and the 
+deployment bag was not recovered.  After studying the zipper and thinking
+about the main deployment sequence, several changes will be made before the
+next flight:
+
+       - The main airframe tube will be replaced with a tube that's a bit
+         longer (for greater stability), and has an internal 7.5-8" diameter
+         tube instead of the flat baffle to ease main chute deployment.
+
+       - Switch from the ARRD to the largest [Tender Descender](http://www.tinderrocketry.com/l13-tender-descender-tether) for main deployment
+
+       - Add a TeleGPS to the nose assembly so it can be tracked 
+         independently, and let it come down under the 2 existing 5-foot
+         chutes.  Add a third 5-foot chute to be a dedicated pilot for the
+         28-foot main chute.
+
+These changes should reduce the chance of another zipper, and reduce the amount
+of strap we need to stuff into the bay.
+
+All in all, this first flight was an outstanding group effort, a lovely 
+flight, and a huge crowd-pleaser!